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    Hey, check me out as the Sprint All Together Fan! Had fun filming with MLB Network and Nick Stevens!http://yankees.mlb.com/sponsors/sprint/all_together/

    mikey1
    June 12, 2011
    11:05 PM
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    i was truly touched by her positive out look. I love her dreams to have a house thatn didnt leak. a man who would love her / treat her as a queen. So simple but in long run it is the biggest thing in the world. . I loved how she would go to games been a dream to go to yankee games. i have been at the spot where you are about to cry an smile . but she overcome. great job capturing her feeling and i felt like i was there meeting her love hope week. have a great day

    jenjeter
    August 18, 2010
    1:15 PM
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    So here is your comment: It is unlikely that Posada would have dropped an easy pop-up.!! Cervelli, is such a bad defensive catcher that he is more likely to drop such an easy pop-up!! Statistics show that Posada would not have dropped it.!!!! Hmmm....... Mr. Preisler, I think you have it totally wrong. Even though Cervelli might have called for it, it could have been a logical reaction at seeing the ball in the infield and obviously wanting to make the catch . To you, it seems irrelevant that 1) the close presence of Vasquez, 2) the likelihood of a collision and 3) the akward position of Cervelli, facing the outfield, had anything to do with missing the ball. To err is human. I find it uncalled for, the amount of adverse media comments Cervelli undeservedly gets. This was an error that ANY catcher can make and it should not trigger the kind of comments that you did. Its refreshing to know, though, that the pitching staff loves to have Cervelli behind the dish

    abey
    August 13, 2010
    8:37 PM
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    When it occurred to me to print excerpts from my transcript as a tribute to Bob Sheppard, I intended to play back the actual voice recording just to kind of refresh myself on his rhythms and inflections. Reading his words, though, I of course realized that wasn't necessary. I could hear him speaking--it was uncanny. It was his son Paul, via the Yanks, who set up the interview for me--and suggested I ask Mr. Sheppard about his WWII service after I'd told him I wanted to explore a part of his life that hadn't been covered by others a hundred times. I thought his naval enlistment story was just great. He really seemed to get a kick out of telling it, and I and smile every time I read it.

    Jerome Preisler
    July 14, 2010
    10:07 AM
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    Thanks for this; it was enjoyable reading, and fun to "hear" Bob's voice speaking as I read his quotes. Some years ago, as Bob approached mid-90s, we all knew that even he couldn't go forever. Poor Paul Olden, as good as he is, he is essentially the Gene Bartow who succeeded John Wooden. The bar was set so incredibly high that no one will ever get close.

    oldschoolyank
    July 12, 2010
    12:47 PM
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    Jerome, totally agree. Since I wrote my initial comment, I have finished Madden's bio of Steinbrenner, reading a few chapters every right before calling it a night. Somewhere about half way through the book, I remember putting it down and thinking that Madden is leaving a lot out. I didn't know exactly what he was leaving out because I don't know George Steinbrenner and I don't work for the Yankees. Yet I do know that the portrait of Steinbrenner in Madden's book focuses on his well-known personality outbursts, but does little to show what made him so successful. He took over his father's shipping business, eventually buying him out, and greatly increased the health of the business, by shifting the business from ore to grain shipments. He also lobbied Congress to change certain rules that ultimately benefited all shippers in the region. He became chairman of the U.S. Olympic Committee, with his changes credited with greatly strengthening the competiveness of the U.S. Olympic teams to this day. Many still consider him the strongest chairman of the past generation. And, of course, he bought the Yankees in 1973, investing no more than $900,000 of his own money, turning them into a $1.2 billion franchise, the most valuable sports organization in the world. He revolutionized the business of all baseball teams through expansion of broadcast revenue, being the first to sell his team's rights to MSG, and then launching his own regional sports network that is now worth more than the actual baseball team. Madden's bio briefly mentions his successes, but spends most of the time focusing on his failures and his personality outbursts. He clearly has a manic personality. We know that. We know he fires managers. Yet we learned little about the culture he created that has led to eleven AL championships and seven world championships. We learned little about his compassionate side. Instead, we’d hear stories about how he went through 12 PR directors in 12 years. That tells us little. Madden almost seems to want to give credit to anyone else but Steinbrenner, the man who built a sports empire and a business resulting in him now being regularly listed in Forbes as one of the 400 richest Americans. He's despised by many of his fellow owners because he bullied, bloodied and bruised them, on the way to beating them. There's a much more interesting story about Steinbrenner out there. That story is yet to be told. Madden missed the mark by quite a bit.

    miked
    July 6, 2010
    12:05 AM
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    There are two Joba's. There's Joba the pitcher and Joba the person. I've gone back and forth liking and hating Joba the pitcher, but always liked and respected Joba the person. I'm sorry to say that feeling is past tense now. If he continues to deflect his poor performances to the overall performance of the bullpen and never takes ownership for his own struggles, He will never improve! It's time for Joba to put on his big boy pants or another uniform!

    captain15
    July 5, 2010
    1:06 PM
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    Joba is living in his own world. He constantly mouths these lame excuses/reasons. It is very simple; his stuff stinks and he has no guts on the mound. How much longer is he going to cost us games in a three team race for first place???? As far as pitch selection, it won't matter as long as he is throwing the weak stuff that he has for most of this year.

    bigbbfan
    July 4, 2010
    1:04 PM
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    JP, Hi! Haven't been to your column in awhile, as I've been WORKING! Man, it's fun. Anyway, I can't believe that you missed one huge point on this topic. By emphasizing that the Yanks managed to win last season despite the Joba Rules (thereby implying that maybe the Hughes Rules won't turn out to be that big a deal, even though you do express the concern that they might be in other parts of the column), you blew right past the point that the Joba Rules, succeeded in changing Joba from an awesome pitcher, to an ineffective one - not only last season, but this one as well. As I'm writing this, I'm not aware of ANYONE, who is totally certain that Joba will ever again be the awesome pitcher that he once was. There is still a decent chance that in their efforts to protect him, they instead wrecked him. Now they're employing the same logic with Hughes. While they're so damn busy trying to fix something which isn't broken...weren't Chamberlain, and Hughes, the guys Cashman insisted couldn't be given up for Santana? Didn't we make the lousy decision to go after Burnett, at least in part because we hadn't made the decision to go after Santana? And didn't we pass on Halladay, at least in part because we had these two youngsters? Imagine if the net result, of skipping Santana; getting Burnett; skipping Halladay; and keeping Hughes and Chamberlain; would be no Santana, no Halladay, and being stuck with a lousy Burnett, a lousy Chamberlain, and a lousy Hughes? If that happens, could we please start looking for a replacement for Cashman?

    desalesman
    July 4, 2010
    10:41 AM
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    Wow! I'm too speachless to add on to this. Joba better get rid of the attitude of "next time" and straighten out now or he may be sitting the season out! As usual another great insight and column Jerome. Happy 4th.

    LadyT
    July 3, 2010
    12:42 PM
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