Results for tag: Derek Jeter
Posted by: Larry Fleisher on Jul 18, 2011 at 01:40:01 AM

I don’t know about you but I can’t get enough of leafing through the Derek Jeter list of his 3,000+ hits. There are a million ways (not really a million ways) you can break it down even nearly a week later and those are more interesting than other things associated with the milestone.

You can go lefty/righty, by first name, starter or reliever, Red Sox, Orioles, guys from California, the Dominican Republic. You get the idea and I did none of those things, what I did was find the hits of pitchers that Jeter was a teammate of at some point and that counts pitchers who did not last one month as a Yankee

The first teammate that Jeter got a hit off was Randy Johnson. Johnson was here 2005-2006 and Jeter’s third hit came off the “Big Unit” on May 31, 1995 and that

...
Posted by: Larry Fleisher on Jul 11, 2011 at 01:40:11 AM

Seventeen seasons is a long time and a lot can happen in that span. Some of us can go from being in the 10th grade to graduating college, to getting their first full-time job, seeing it move and making adjustments due to circumstances beyond our control.

Along that span, you might even get a chance to see a Yankee game or two or a few hundred in person from the stands or from somewhere else in the stadium. Along the way, you might travel occasionally to a few other venues within your own city or somewhere in the Pacific Time Zone.

Wherever you’ve seen the Yankees, chances are you’ve seen Derek Jeter play and get a hit, especially since he has 3,004 of those.  With the internet, you can combine having a good memory to figure out how many hits you’ve seen in person

...
Posted by: Larry Fleisher on Jul 8, 2011 at 02:21:29 AM

For years, especially since 2004, Derek Jeter has always been linked to a third baseman with the surname Rodriguez. The reasons are varied and have been played out in tabloids and various books.

As Jeter’s quest for 3,000 hits continues its summer tour this weekend at Yankee Stadium, he is linked to a Rodriguez. Here’s a hint, his first name is not Alex and he has never played with Jeter.

The man is Sean Rodriguez, a utility man acquired by the Rays two summers ago from the Angels for Scott Kazmir. Rodriguez happened to be playing third base last night and as fate would have it his path crossed with Jeter.

Rather, his glove crossed with Jeter’s swings. Jeter went 1-for-5 last night and in the four instances following his 2,998th career hit, he grounded out.

...
Posted by: Larry Fleisher on Jul 6, 2011 at 12:56:31 AM

Every time CC Sabathia takes the mound at Yankee Stadium, his song of choice is Notorious B.I.G's hit "Big Poppa". Even with some lyrics that probably can't be repeated here, it has a beat of serenity and calmness that signals things will be all right or in recent cases - more than all right.

That is an appropriate theme for one of the most laid-back personalities in the game, the type who will freely roam around the clubhouse joking around with teammates in the hours before starts.

Many times, the kind of pitching display that Sabathia has put on gets overshadowed by things such as the inconsistencies of A.J. Burnett or the developmental obstacles of Phil Hughes. It's like a former boss once said in Jersey City - nobody says anything unless you do something wrong - and nowadays that

...
Posted by: Larry Fleisher on Jun 26, 2011 at 11:31:27 AM

Today is June 26 and 37 years ago, the Yankees played a weekday afternoon game over the Indians and fell short with a 3-2 loss at Shea Stadium.

The shortstop that day for the Yankees was Jim Mason and eventually Gene Michael, who moved from second to shortstop. It was doubtful that Michael knew 18 years later he would be responsible for drafting another shortstop born sometime that day.

Elsewhere on that day, the shortstop that Michael would have a key role in drafting 18 years later was starting his life as the first Yankee to reach 3,000 hits and that would be Derek Jeter.

A month ago if you said Jeter would not have reached the milestone by now, more of that slump talk would have polluted the airwaves, but today Jeter won’t reach that mark because he is in Tampa Bay rehabbing

...
Posted by: Larry Fleisher on Jun 13, 2011 at 01:15:45 AM

Many times when a Yankee pitcher puts a runner or two on base, the fan's first reaction is to either panic on some social networking site that begins with a "T" and ends with an R". Another reaction is not to sweat it and focus on the next batter.

If he was a fan and not a major league pitcher, Freddy Garcia is the type of person who fits into the second category and that's a good trait for a pitcher to have.

In other words, if there is a runner on base, he's not the type to worry about it and does not get distracted by it. If you want proof consider this statistic of Garcia's at the time of his first pitch.

That would be his batting average with runners on base, which stood at .221 (21-for-95) with men on base.

By the time the Yankees wrapped up the win, that number dropped to .198

...
Posted by: Larry Fleisher on Jun 9, 2011 at 03:14:50 AM

Two years ago the Yankees failed to win their first eight games against the Red Sox and spent a portion of that summer answering questions worded a hundred different ways about that issue. Eventually they finally answered with a resounding four-game sweep during the first weekend of August that resembled the five-game sweep in Boston three years earlier.

That weekend happened to be A.J. Burnett's best start against the Red Sox as a Yankee. During the second game of the series, a 15-inning victory, Burnett walked six but allowed just one hit in 7 2/3 innings. Since that game, Burnett is 19-23 with a 4.94 ERA.

And even that could be a misleading number. Since that Friday night, Burnett has allowed at least five runs 15 times and failed to get past the six 22 times.

Last night, Burnett

...
Posted by: Larry Fleisher on Jun 6, 2011 at 12:36:00 AM

What you witnessed from the Yankees was a rare thing these days and that is not just a series victory against the Angels in Anaheim.

The rarity is the Seattle-Oakland-Anaheim trip and making all those stops on the same trip. That trip is rarity because of things like having to play six series against division rivals and having to play interleague games.

The unbalanced schedule has been in place since 2001 and interleague play has existed since 1997, meaning that the three city West Coast trip is mostly a thing of the past. It usually gets combined with something strange like Chicago-Seattle-New York, which the Yankees did in 2007 or Anaheim-Seattle-Toronto, which the Yankees will do in the middle of September.

The last time the Yankees had a trip that actually was scheduled in this manner

...
Posted by: Larry Fleisher on May 16, 2011 at 04:01:35 AM

Shortly before 1 AM after another marathon Yankee-Red Sox game, the police officers assembled on the mezzanine overlooking the tracks where the D train would take people away from Yankee Stadium.

And what they heard from their commander was a job well done followed by applause.

An hour earlier, the Yankees walked off the field up the stairs and across the street and probably did not hear the same.

"It seems like when things are going bad," manager Joe Girardi said, "It goes bad."

Bad would be a nice way to describe the events on the field after the Yankees had been swept by their biggest rival and then headed for a flight to play two games apiece in Tampa Bay and Baltimore with the hope they can figure out why their performance has been the complete opposite of those officers getting

...
Posted by: Larry Fleisher on May 15, 2011 at 07:20:35 PM

Today is May 15 and 70 years ago today, Joe DiMaggio’s historic 56-game hitting streak began with a first-inning single off Chicago White Sox pitcher Eddie Smith in a 13-1 loss.

That loss was the fifth in a row for a 101-win Yankee team that actually fell to 15-16.

Chances are on that Thursday morning, DiMaggio might have faced some pregame questions about an 8-for-41 (.195) slump that dropped his batting average from .373 to .306. And perhaps manager Joe McCarthy might have faced some of the same line of questioning.

Assuming he did, let’s guess that it wasn’t quite the sizable crowd that surrounded Jorge Posada’s locker eager to hear from the emotional Yankee catcher turned struggling designated hitter.

To say that area of the clubhouse was tension-filled sometime

...