Results for tag: Russell Martin
Posted by: Larry Fleisher on Aug 26, 2011 at 01:16:01 AM

The Yankees get a hit 27 percent of the time. During the fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth inning, they had a hit 62.3 percent of the time.

By going 15-for-23 in those innings, the Yankees actually topped themselves by hitting grand slams. When Russell Martin hit the second grand slam, the Yankees were in the process of announcing the last time two had been hit in the same game.

That actually was a game I remember. It was September 14, 1999 in Toronto in the eighth and ninth when Bernie Williams and Paul O'Neill pulled it off in rallying the Yankees from five runs down for a 10-6 victory.

The other time that happened was June 29, 1987 at Toronto. Dave Winfield hit a grand slam off Tom Henke for the go-ahead runs in a 15-14 victory and Don Mattingly hit one off John Cerutti in the third.

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Posted by: Larry Fleisher on Jun 13, 2011 at 01:15:45 AM

Many times when a Yankee pitcher puts a runner or two on base, the fan's first reaction is to either panic on some social networking site that begins with a "T" and ends with an R". Another reaction is not to sweat it and focus on the next batter.

If he was a fan and not a major league pitcher, Freddy Garcia is the type of person who fits into the second category and that's a good trait for a pitcher to have.

In other words, if there is a runner on base, he's not the type to worry about it and does not get distracted by it. If you want proof consider this statistic of Garcia's at the time of his first pitch.

That would be his batting average with runners on base, which stood at .221 (21-for-95) with men on base.

By the time the Yankees wrapped up the win, that number dropped to .198

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Posted by: Larry Fleisher on May 22, 2011 at 11:30:43 AM

Today is May 22 and a year ago at this exact time, the Yankees had hit 50 home runs. Two years ago at the same time, they had 66. Three years ago at the same moment (the morning of May 22), the Yankees had connected 46 times.

Those are the home run figures through games of May 21 the previous three years of Joe Girardi's managerial reign and following yesterday's four home run display, the Yankees have hit 70 in 1482 at-bats, which means that every 21.1 at-bats a home run will leave someone's bat.

The home runs have helped the Yankees lead the AL with 226 runs scored and with a .447 slugging percentage, but they also have seen the Yankees rank low in other hitting categories. In doubles, the Yankees are 14th, in total hits, they are 11th and in batting average, they are ninth.

Much has

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Posted by: Larry Fleisher on May 16, 2011 at 04:01:35 AM

Shortly before 1 AM after another marathon Yankee-Red Sox game, the police officers assembled on the mezzanine overlooking the tracks where the D train would take people away from Yankee Stadium.

And what they heard from their commander was a job well done followed by applause.

An hour earlier, the Yankees walked off the field up the stairs and across the street and probably did not hear the same.

"It seems like when things are going bad," manager Joe Girardi said, "It goes bad."

Bad would be a nice way to describe the events on the field after the Yankees had been swept by their biggest rival and then headed for a flight to play two games apiece in Tampa Bay and Baltimore with the hope they can figure out why their performance has been the complete opposite of those officers getting

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Posted by: Larry Fleisher on May 6, 2011 at 02:27:52 AM

First a confession, I didn't watch most of this four-game series with Detroit that from the looks of it and accounts in the paper was not the Yankees' finest hour of the first 29 games. First it represents their first three-game losing streak of the year and secondly it is a continuation of the offensive slump that seems to be two weeks old.

You might remember two weeks ago. That was when the Yankees went from Toronto to Baltimore. After a rainout on April 22, the Yankees scored 15 times on 14 hits the next night.

Since that time, the Yankees have split their 12 games and the reason is mostly at the plate. The Yankees have scored 46 runs (3.8 per game), which is not great, but also not terrible. Yet it is a dip from the six averaged through the first 17 games.

The most noticeable dip

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Posted by: Larry Fleisher on May 1, 2011 at 01:58:42 AM

For the second straight season, the Yankees have won 15 games in the opening month. They were 15-7 last year and by going 15-9 this month, the Yankees have won at least that amount of games in consecutive opening months for the first time since 2002 and 2003 teams were a combined 38-16 in those Aprils.

The Yankee offense has had an interesting and contrasting month.

The .253 batting average places them slightly above the league average which was .249 going into Saturday's games. The .337 on-base percentage ranks in the top half of the league and well above the league average of .319 going into Saturday's game.

Where the Yankees have really shined offensively is hitting home runs. Their 43 home runs lead the league by far and only four of their 24 games have not featured a home run and

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Posted by: Larry Fleisher on Apr 26, 2011 at 02:23:23 AM

Being selfish is among the worst human traits anyone can have in most aspects of their lives.

There are some exceptions and for me it involves no-hitters. Everyone has their bucketlist of things they've never done and never seen and for me that is a no-hitter, which is what was a distinct possibility when Phil Humber pitched 6 1/3 innings without allowing a hit.

It seemed something special was brewing for Humber when he fanned Russell Martin on one of his 30 changeups but then Alex Rodriguez spoiled it with a single in the seventh.  Rodriguez probably caused some if not all in the press box to exhale since writing a no-hitter story takes extra time and work, but even I had to do extra work, I would not have minded.

"The way he threw today, even if we'd faced him before, it was a

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Posted by: Larry Fleisher on Apr 18, 2011 at 03:52:15 AM

During the week of October 16-23, the Yankees stopped hitting and stopped pitching in a six-game series with the Texas Rangers and lost their chance at repeating as World Series champions. During that mostly unproductive week, Eric Chavez, Russell Martin, Rafael Soriano and Freddy Garcia were elsewhere.

Since the regular season and in Soriano's case, postseason had ended a few weeks earlier, the quartet might not have necessarily been thinking of future plans then. Eventually they would have to, either by having the benefits of free agency or being unwanted by a previous team.

Martin was the first since the Dodgers non-tendered him on December 2 and decided to go with Rod Barajas. Although Martin is considerably younger than Barajas, it didn't seem like the Dodgers had confidence in staying

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Posted by: Larry Fleisher on Apr 8, 2011 at 12:38:57 AM

For years, the book on A.J. Burnett has been high-velocity fastball and a curve that sometimes comes with a devastating hook.

When you’ve gone 10-15 relying on those two things, there comes a time to evolve or change it up slightly. For Burnett, his recovery this year might be contingent on the development and success of the changeup - a pitch that is designed to compliment his primary pitches.

Yesterday Burnett threw 12 changeups - primarily to lefties and that doubled his total he threw in five innings against the Detroit Tigers Saturday.

Last year, Burnett threw 3,175 pitches and just 84 were changeups. In 2009, he threw 4,117 pitches and just 77 were changeups.

Three years ago as an 18-game winner with the Toronto Blue Jays, Burnett threw 3,530 pitches and 130 of those were

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