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1 week ago  ::  Nov 16, 2014 - 5:13PM #4641
FW57Clipper51
Posts: 11,533

A Great article on Yankees uniform numbers posted by MajorYankFan


Clipper


11 Facts About #11 – Yankees Style



Courtesy of insanityjerseys.com

Courtesy of insanityjerseys.com




(I do realize that this post would have been more appropriate if today was 11/11/11 but I wasn’t writing for this site at the time. Oh well.)



Here are 11 facts about #11:

  • Herb Pennock was the first to wear #11 in 1929.
  • Lefty Gomez was the first player to wear it for multiple years and the longest tenured #11: 1932-1942.
  • From 2000-2008 nine players/coaches wore #11: Chuck KnoblauchChris WidgerDavid Dellucci,Curtis PrideErick AlmonteGary SheffieldDoug Mientkiewicz, Mitch Seone (coach), andMorgan Ensberg.
  • Brett Gardner is the longest tenure #11 since Chuck Knoblauch who wore it from 1998-2002ish.
  • Buck Showlater wore it when he was a coach and manager.
  • Sheffield, Gomez, Joe Page and Johnny Sain are the only 11’s to be All-Stars.
  • Seone, Showalter, Jeff Torborg and Gene Michael are the coaches/managers who wore #11.
  • Sandy Alomar and Fred Stanley shared the number during the 1974 season then Stanley wore it from 1975-1980.
  • The only player to repeat as 11 in the 1980s was Don Slaught from 1988-89. The only coach to repeat as 11 in the 1980s was Gene Michael from 1981-82. The other guys who wore it in that decade were Stanley (1980), Torborg (1983), Toby Harrah (1984), Billy Sample (1985), Gary Roenicke (1986), and Lenn Sakata (1987).
  • If you put the guys who have worn #11 in order alphabetically, Bernie Allen would be first and Widger would be last. (Some of them would also be dead because some of these guys wore 11 way back in the 30’s, 40’s and 50’s)
  • Stanley wore it the year I was born, Showalter wore it the year I graduated high school, Sheffield wore it the year I turned 30 and Gardner wore it this year when I turned 40. I wonder who will be wearing it for my 50th birthday. Any guesses? I’m betting it will be the offspring of someone I grew up watching which will make me feel really old.


Hope you enjoyed this trip down memory lane. I also hope that there were at least a few times where you said to yourself, ‘Oh yeah! I remember that guy!’ or ‘Holy crap, I forgot he was even on the Yankees!’



Great Article, there is no excuse for forgetting #11 of 1959-1966 Yankees OF/INF Hector Lopez!



Clipper



http://i50.tinypic.com/vfvbja.jpg


1 week ago  ::  Nov 16, 2014 - 5:46PM #4642
MajorYankFan
Posts: 10,307

A look at the Yankees farm system if George was still alive


www.pinstripealley.com/2014/11/16/722786...

We hear a lot about how George Steinbrenner would act if he were still around. Let's take a closer look.


It's fine to wax nostalgic for the good old days when the Yankees ruled the universe. I know I certainly do. But let's try to keep our history in clear enough view that we can be grateful for the things we have.



Imagine if George was still around. The payroll would be $350M, and the farm system would be empty. But we'd have MOAR STARZ!!!







Larry Gura for Fran Healy



Fran Healy was a backup catcher. But someone had to work on the days that Thurman Munson needed off, so the Yankees got Healy. What they gave up for Healy was a 27-year-old starter who'd just pitched 150 innings for the first time in his career, to a league-average ERA.



Modern equivalent: probably trading a David Phelps for the Orioles' Caleb Joseph.



Steve Trout



Trout was a solid pitcher before his trade to the Yankees. A case of the yips (nine wild pitches and 37 walks in 46 innings), and that's what they call a career. As far as I know, Trout was one of the original "can't hack it in NY" players. Unfortunately, one of the guys that the Yankees gave up, Bob Tewksbury, went on to have a thirteen-year career highlighted by three 200-inning seasons and a third place finish in the 1992 Cy Young voting.



Modern equivalent: I most think of Trout as the precursor to Javier Vazquez. It's not the trade that was bad; Trout was a perfectly average pitcher for the first eight years of his career. The disaster was that he was such a headcase.



Jay Buhner for Ken Phelps



The immortal Seinfeld trade.



Modern equivalent: Buhner hit .279/.351/.514 in Triple-A at 22 years old. No. 2 prospect Gary Sanchez just hit .270/.338/.406 in Double-A. So imagine if the Yankees traded Sanchez this offseason for Adam LaRoche. Now imagine that they completed that trade in a season where their All-Star first baseman and his iconic mustache hit .311/.353/.462 and played 144 games. 1988 was a weird year.



Willie McGee for Bob Sykes



Willie McGee had an 18-year career, three gold gloves, a silver slugger and was the 1985 MVP. What he did not have was a single game in Yankee pinstripes. The guy the Yankees got for McGee, the immortal Bob Sykes, also never pitched well enough to get into a game for the big league club.



Modern equivalent: McGee was hitting .289/.357/.375 as a 20-year-old splitting the season between Single-A and Double-A with the Yankees. We can all agree those are not amazing numbers. But to trade a guy that young and to get absolutely nothing in return, it would be a bit like trading Ramon Flores to re-acquire Vidal Nuno.



Hideki Irabu



My issue here has less to do with the acquisition of Irabu (heck, I'm still ok with the signing of Igawa; it's not my money). But let's not forget what George called Irabu when the gentleman from Japan failed to cover first base during spring training.



Modern equivalent: Thank goodness George didn't live to see Carlos Beltran's regrettable moment in right field.



Mike Lowell for Ed Yarnell and others



Modern equivalent: You know the season that Aaron Judge just had in A-ball? Mike Lowell had a similar season in Triple-A and he played Gold Glove defense. Those 90s Yankees rolled on anyway, but I wonder what the team would have looked like with Lowell at third. Could he have turned the double play in Game 7 2001? 2003 would certainly have played out very differently, with him in pinstripes instead of in the opposite dugout.



Fred McGriff for Dale Murray



McGriff hit a ton of home runs, and made a not-quite-strong-enough case for the Hall of Fame. He was an 18-year-old in the Gulf Coast League when he was traded for a 33-year-old Dale Murray. Murray managed to post ERA+ of 87, 78, 34 over the final 100 innings of his career, to bring his career ERA+ down to exactly 100.



Modern equivalent: Who's your favorite Baby Bomber? Luis Torrens or Jorge Mateo? Well, the Yankees just traded him for Joba Chamberlain.

5 days ago  ::  Nov 20, 2014 - 6:03PM #4643
FW57Clipper51
Posts: 11,533


A look at the Yankees farm system if George was still alive













We hear a lot about how George Steinbrenner would act if he were still around. Let's take a closer look.



It's fine to wax nostalgic for the good old days when the Yankees ruled the universe. I know I certainly do. But let's try to keep our history in clear enough view that we can be grateful for the things we have.


Imagine if George was still around. The payroll would be $350M, and the farm system would be empty. But we'd have MOAR STARZ!!!


Larry Gura for Fran Healy


Fran Healy was a backup catcher. But someone had to work on the days that Thurman Munson needed off, so the Yankees got Healy. What they gave up for Healy was a 27-year-old starter who'd just pitched 150 innings for the first time in his career, to a league-average ERA.


Modern equivalent: probably trading a David Phelps for the Orioles' Caleb Joseph.


Fran Haley was a decent back-up catcher, the Yankees also had Rick Dempsey on the MLB roster at the same time. Larry Gura came to the Yankess from the Rangers went 5-1 in 1974. With the arrival of Manager Billy Martin, pitchers Larry Gura as well as Tippy Martinez were in Billy's doghouse, both were traded away during the 1976 AL season.




Steve Trout


Steve Trout was a solid pitcher for the Chicago Cubs before his trade to the New York Yankees. A case of the yips (nine wild pitches and 37 walks in 46 innings), and that's what they call a career. As far as I know, Trout was one of the original "can't hack it in NY" players. Unfortunately, one of the guys that the Yankees gave up, Bob Tewksbury, went on to have a thirteen-year career highlighted by three 200-inning seasons and a third place finish in the 1992 Cy Young voting.




Trout was a decent pitcher with the Cubbies, the trade seemed so promising at the time.


Modern equivalent: I most think of Trout as the precursor to Javier Vazquez. It's not the trade that was bad; Trout was a perfectly average pitcher for the first eight years of his career. The disaster was that he was such a headcase.


Jay Buhner for Ken Phelps


The immortal Seinfeld trade.


Modern equivalent: Buhner hit .279/.351/.514 in Triple-A at 22 years old. No. 2 prospect Gary Sanchez just hit .270/.338/.406 in Double-A. So imagine if the Yankees traded Sanchez this offseason for Adam LaRoche. Now imagine that they completed that trade in a season where their All-Star first baseman and his iconic mustache hit .311/.353/.462 and played 144 games. 1988 was a weird year.




The Yankees managed to land Jay Buhner from the Pirates in a trade as a 19 year old Class A player, Supposely the Yankees made the trade to block a AL rival (aka Red Sox) from obtaining him. The Yankees organization had drafted Phelps as a college player, but he didn't sign with the team.




Willie McGee for Bob Sykes














Willie McGee had an 18-year MLB career, 3 gold gloves, a silver slugger and was the 1985 MVP. What he did not have was a single game in Yankee pinstripes. The guy the Yankees got for McGee, the immortal Bob Sykes, also never pitched well enough to get into a game for the big league club.




Willie McGee was blocked at MLB level by Yankee MLB free agents in outfield. Sykes was injuired in spring training camp and he never pitched again. The next season, the St. Louis Cardinals sent INF Bobby Meecham (Former #1 draft pick) and OF Stan Javier to the Yankees in a "make-up" trade.




Modern equivalent: McGee was hitting .289/.357/.375 as a 20-year-old splitting the season between Single-A and Double-A with the Yankees. We can all agree those are not amazing numbers. But to trade a guy that young and to get absolutely nothing in return, it would be a bit like trading Ramon Flores to re-acquire Vidal Nuno.


Hideki Irabu


My issue here has less to do with the acquisition of Irabu (heck, I'm still ok with the signing of Igawa; it's not my money). But let's not forget what George called Irabu when the gentleman from Japan failed to cover first base during spring training.


Modern equivalent: Thank goodness George didn't live to see Carlos Beltran's regrettable moment in right field.




Mike Lowell for  3 Minor League Pitchers: Todd Noel, Mark Johnson and Ed Yarnall.






Modern equivalent: You know the season that Aaron Judge just had in A-ball? Mike Lowell had a similar season in Triple-A and he played Gold Glove defense. Those 90s Yankees rolled on anyway, but I wonder what the team would have looked like with Lowell at third. Could he have turned the double play in Game 7 2001? 2003 would certainly have played out very differently, with him in pinstripes instead of in the opposite dugout.






With Scott Borius at 3B, there was no room at the Yankees MLB Inn for Lowell. Trying to rebuild their pitching strength in the minor leagues, they took 3 young pitchers from the Marlins. Todd Noel, Mark Johnson and Ed Yarnall.




Dave Collins, Mike Morgan, Minor League 1B Fred McGriff for  Reliever Dale Murray and Tom Todd




Fred McGriff hit a ton of home runs, and made a not-quite-strong-enough case for the Hall of Fame. He was an 18-year-old in the Gulf Coast League when he was traded for a 33-year-old Dale Murray. Murray managed to post ERA+ of 87, 78, 34 over the final 100 innings of his career, to bring his career ERA+ down to exactly 100.




Classic Cherry picking of a trade: Fred McGriff was a 18 year old 1B at Fort Lauderale Class A at the time of the trade, there was no way the Yankees knew how he would turn out at the MLB, beside we had "Donnie Baseball" and "Bye-Bye" Balboni ahead of him in the Yankees farm system at 1st base. The Blue Jays wanted MLB players 1B/DH/OF Dave Collins and Pitcher Mike Morgan.






Modern equivalent: Who's your favorite Baby Bomber? Luis Torrens or Jorge Mateo? Well, the Yankees just traded him for Joba Chamberlain.







Clipper











http://i50.tinypic.com/vfvbja.jpg


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