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Veteran's Day and Yankees who have served
4 years ago  ::  Nov 10, 2013 - 5:27PM #41
FW57Clipper51
Posts: 14,663

New York Yankees Reserve Catcher Charlie Silvera



Charlie Silvera 1948-1956


 


Date and Place of Birth: October 13, 1924 San Francisco, California


Baseball Experience: Major League
Position: Catcher
Rank: Unknown


Military Unit: USAAF


Area Served: Pacific Theater of Operations


 


The Yankees' back-up catcher during the heyday of DiMaggio, Berra and Mantle. Silvera served in the Pacific Theater with the USAAF and went on to play in the major leagues for 10 seasons.


 



Charlie Silvera was born on October 13, 1924, in San Francisco, California. He grew up in the Mission District, and attended St. Ignatius High School. “I had signed to play pro ball in May 1942,” explains Silvera, “and along with Jerry Coleman, reported to the Wellsville Yankees of the PONY League for the remainder of the season.”

Silvera played 75 games with Wellsville and batted a respectable .254 (Jerry Coleman hit .304 in 83 games). The following spring, aged 18, he was called into the service and was initially stationed at McClellan Field in California. The following year Corporal Silvera was sent to Hickam Field in Hawaii, and then to the Pacific islands where he played baseball with the 73rd Bombardment Wing Bombers.

"I was stationed at Saipan and there were also two teams on Tinian,” he explains. “We were attached to the 20th Air Force and our team included Tex Hughson [Braves], Dario Lodigiani [White Sox], Ferris Fain [Athletics] and Mike McCormick [Cubs].

"We used bomb crates as sideline markers and fences and because Joe Gordon’s [Yankees] and Joe Marty's [Phillies] club [58th Bombardment Wing Wingmen] had the most power, we would move the bomb crates back 10 to 20 feet. With the other Tinian club [313th Bombardment Wing Flyers] we would move the bomb crate fence in depending on who was pitching.



58th Wingmen playing the 73rd Bombers on Saipan, August 1945. Joe Marty of the 58th Wingmen is at-bat. Charlie Silvera is the catcher and Joe Gordon is on deck (far left).


Playing baseball as entertainment for the troops may sound like a pleasurable way to spend the war but it was not without its dangers. “Japanese soldiers would watch the games from the jungle in the background and go back and hide when the game was over. In our spare time we would venture to places ‘off limits’. The Japanese were still around us but the bananas were worth it!”




Bananas were plentiful on Saipan for the 73rd Bombers.
(Back row, left to right): Tex Hughson, Dario Lodigiani, Ferris Fain, Mike McCormick, unknown.
(Front row, left to right): Charlie Silvera, unknown, Chet Kehn.




Furthermore, Silvera believes that wartime baseball helped him to improve as a player. “The war was unfortunate for a lot of major league players because they lost two, three and sometimes four years in the service,” he says. “I was fortunate to play with great players and benefit from their guidance and experience.”

Silvera was back in the Yankees’ organization in 1946 and played 91 games with the Kansas City Blues of the Class AAA American Association. In 1947 he joined the Portland Beavers of the Class AAA Pacific Coast League, and after batting .301 with Beavers in 1948, Silvera made his major league debut with the New York Yankees for four games at the end of the season.

Silvera spent the next eight years as a back-up catcher to Yogi Berra and was eligible for seven World Series although he only appeared in Game 2 of the 1949 Series. He ended his major league career with the Chicago Cubs in 1957 and was back with the Yankees’ organization in 1958 as a player-manager with the New Orleans Pelicans of the Southern Association. “I managed three years in the minors,” he recalls, “coached under Billy Martin at Minnesota, and scouted for Washington, Atlanta, Oakland, the Yankees, Milwaukee and Florida.”

“I had a wonderful career,” he told the New York Times on June 12, 2008. “I couldn’t have scripted it any better.”

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4 years ago  ::  Nov 10, 2013 - 5:33PM #42
FW57Clipper51
Posts: 14,663

New York Yankees Shortstop Phil Rizzuto



Phil Rizzuto


 


Date and Place of Birth: September 25, 1917 Brooklyn, New York


Died: August 14, 2007


Baseball Experience: Major League
Position: Shortstop
Rank: Unknown
Military Unit: US Navy


Area Served: Pacific Theater of Operations


 





























Philip F "Phil" Rizzuto was born in Brooklyn, New York on September 25, 1917. He played both baseball and football at Richmond Hill High School in Queens, New York.

He was signed by the Yankees in 1937, and the diminutive shortstop batted .307 in his rookie major league season with the Yankees in 1941. The following season, Rizzuto was an American League all-star but it was his last season in professional baseball for the duration of the war.


 























Rizzuto served with the Navy at Norfolk Naval Training Station in 1943 where he played baseball on a regular basis. He was later in charge of 20mm gun crew on a ship in the Pacific, but contracted malaria while in New Guinea. Rizzuto was sent to Australia to recover and coached the US Navy baseball team while there.

 


Rizzuto was back with the Yankees in 1946, but his first after three years of military service, was one of his worse offensively, batting just .252. Rizzuto would soon turn things around and by the time he retired after the 1956 season, Scooter had appeared in nine World Series and been named to five All-Star teams.




































Phil Rizzuto later became a broadcaster for the Yankees. His uniform No 10 was retired by the Yankees August 4, 1985 on Phil Rizzuto Day, but he ended up being upstaged by Tom Seaver, who pitched his 300th career victory that afternoon for the Chicago White Sox. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1994.


 


Phil Rizzuto passed away on August 14, 2007. He was 89 years old.


 


 

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4 years ago  ::  Nov 10, 2013 - 5:38PM #43
FW57Clipper51
Posts: 14,663

New York Yankees Catcher Bill Dickey


 


Date and Place of Birth: June 6, 1907  Bastrop, Louisiana


Died: November 12, 1993 Little Rock, Arkansas
Baseball Experience: Major League
Position: Catcher
Rank: Lieutenant Junior Grade
Military Unit: US Navy


Area Served: Pacific Theater of Operations


 






















William M "Bill" Dickey was born on June 6, 1907 in Bastrop, Louisiana. He was 21 years old when he joined the Yankees in 1928. The following year he became the Yankees' number one catcher and remained in that position until 1943. During that time he appeared in eight world series and ten all-star games, and his .362 batting average in 1936 was third best in the American League.

 


Dickey was drafted on June 3, 1944, even though he was 37 and suffered from a bad sinus condition. He was sworn in at Memphis, Tennessee, as a deck volunteer specialist with the US Naval Reserve. Dickey served as an athletic officer in the Pacific and managed the US Navy team that won 1944 Service World Series in Hawaii.


 


Dickey was back with the Yankees in 1946 and succeeded Joe McCarthy as the club's manager in May. The following year he began managing in the minor leagues but was brought back to the Yankees to work on Yogi Berra's defensive skills.


 


Bill Dickey was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1954. He passed away in Little Rock, Arkansas on November 12, 1993, aged 86.




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4 years ago  ::  Nov 10, 2013 - 5:55PM #44
FW57Clipper51
Posts: 14,663

New York Yankees OF Joe DiMaggio



Joe DiMaggio


 


Date and Place of Birth: November 15, 1914 Martinez, California


Died: March 8, 1999 Hollywood, Florida
Baseball Experience: Major League
Position: Outfield
Rank: Staff Sergeant
Military Unit: United States Army Air Force


Area Served: United States


 


Private Joe DiMaggio's spring training has been somewhat, different this year and not much time is devoted to baseball at Santa Ana Army Air Base, where he is stationed, but the Yankee Clipper hasn't lost his batting eye. In five games Joe has pounded out six hits from eighteen official times at bat.


Reno Evening Gazette May 18, 1943


 





































Joseph Paul “Joe” DiMaggio was born in Martinez, California on November 25, 1914. DiMaggio was the eighth of nine children born to Sicilian immigrants. DiMaggio dropped out of high school in 1930 and spent much of his time playing baseball at the diary-wagon parking lot, an open space where milk drivers parked their horses and wagons, near San Francisco’s fisherman’s wharf.


 
He soon joined a team sponsored by a local olive-oil distributor named Ross and helped them win the championship with two home runs in a game.
  Joe’s older brother, Vince, was playing for the San Francisco Seals in 1932. During the season a shortstop was needed, and Vince recommended his younger brother. Joe made his professional debut appearing in three with the Seals. The following year he hit .340 with 169 RBIs, and an incredible 61-game hitting streak.

In November of 1934, the Seals owner, Charlie Graham, sold DiMaggio to the New York Yankees for $25,000 dollars and five players. A knee injury kept Joe from reporting to the Yankees that year but he made his major league debut in 1936, hitting .323 with 29 home runs.
DiMaggio was an MVP in 1939 and recorded a magical 56-game hitting streak in 1941 that captivated the nation.


 


During the spring of 1942, much publicity surrounded DiMaggio’s hold out for a pay rise. A group of soldiers from Camp Blanding, Florida, sent him a telegram that read: “In event the Yankees don’t kick in with more than $37,000, we cordially invite you to a tryout with the 143rd Infantry, 36th Division, the fightingest regiment in this man’s Army.”


 


On February 17th, 1943, DiMaggio traded his $43‚750 salary from the Yankees‚ for $50 a month as an army enlisted man. “He is built for the soldier,” wrote Dan Daniel in Baseball magazine. “He has the temperament for the soldier. He has gone into the Army looking for no favors, searching for no job as a coach. He wants to fight, and when he gets his chance, he will prove a credit to himself and his game and the Yanks and his family. This DiMaggio guy really has it.”


 


He was assigned to Special Services with the Army Air Force and reported for duty on February 24, 1943 to Santa Ana Army Air Base in California, the Army Air Forces’ west coast training center headquarters.


 


DiMaggio was a big boost to the Santa Ana baseball team. The line-up featured pitchers Glen Gabler (brother of major league pitcher Frank Gabler), Jack Jacobs and Three-I Leaguer Bob White; first and second base were Dick and Bobby Adams, who would both play major league baseball after the war; Jack Hanson, formerly with Tulsa of the Texas League played third base; Kenny Andrews, a semi-pro player from Pennsylvania was at shortstop; Merle Hapes and Lee Trim flanked DiMaggio in left and right field; Ohio State University’s Bill Waller was behind the plate and former pro footballer John Biancone was the manager. The Santa Ana team compiled an impressive record including a winning streak of 20 straight games, and DiMaggio put together a 27 consecutive game hitting streak.


 





Santa Ana Army Air Base 1943


(DiMaggio is front row, second right)


DiMaggio entertains troops DiMaggio playing for Santa Ana Army Air Base in 1943

DiMaggio in basic training at Fort Ord, California



 


In addition to the Santa Ana games, DiMaggio played for a team of Armed Forces all-stars managed by Babe Ruth on July 12, 1943, against the Boston Braves.



Sergeant DiMaggio was transferred to Honolulu, Hawaii in June 1944. He served with the Seventh Air Force and played for their baseball team with Red Ruffing, Johnny Beazley, and Joe Gordon. The Navy was also bringing many of their top players to the island including Phil Rizzuto, Pee Wee Reese, Johnny Mize, and Joe’s brother Dom. On
June 4, 1944, DiMaggio hit a 435-foot home run in a Seventh Army Force, 6-2, loss to the Navy‚ as Bob Harris threw a 4-hitter.


 





DiMaggio enjoying an Army meal in Hawaii

Marine pitcher Andy Steinbach congratulates DiMaggio on a Seventh Air Force win DiMaggio with his son, Joseph



DiMaggio with the Seventh Army Air Force DiMaggio in Hawaii DiMaggio with Judnich, McCormick, Lodigiani and Priddy

The Seventh Army Air Force team. DiMaggio is front row, sixth from left
 
(courtesy of Andy Armstrong) 

DiMaggio gets his sergeant's stripes

The Seventh Army Air Force team. DiMaggio is back row, third from left



But a stomach ailment sidelined DiMaggio and he was hospitalized in August He was then transferred to a West Coast hospital and then to Special Services at the Army Air Force Redistribution Station 1 in Atlantic City, New Jersey. In September, he was transferred to the Army Air Forces’ Don Ce Sar Convalescent Hospital in St Petersburg, Florida, again suffering from stomach ulcers. He was released from service on September 14, 1945.


 


"Though he never came within a thousand miles of actual combat," wrote David Jones in Joe DiMaggio: a biography, "DiMaggio resented the war with an intensity equal to the most battle-scarred private. It had robbed him of the best years of his career. When he went into the Army, DiMaggio had been a 28-year-old superstar, still at the height of his athletic powers. By the time he was discharged from the service, he was nearly 31, divorced, underweight, malnourished, and bitter. Those three year, 1943 to 1945, would carve a gaping hole in DiMaggio's career totals, creating an absence that would be felt like a missing limb."


 


Back with the Yankees in 1946, DiMaggio batted .290 - after having been a .300-plus hitter every season before military service. But he was soon back in form and helped guide the Yankees to World Championships in 1947, 1949, 1950, and 1951.


 


DiMaggio announced his retirement on December 11, 1951, four days short of his 37th birthday. He married Marilyn Monroe in 1954 and was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1955. DiMaggio received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977. Following a lengthy battle with lung cancer, DiMaggio passed away at his home in Hollywood, Florida on March 8, 1999. He was 84 years old and is buried at Holy Cross Cemetery in Colma, California.


 

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4 years ago  ::  Nov 10, 2013 - 6:10PM #45
FW57Clipper51
Posts: 14,663

New York Yankees Pitcher Tommy Bryne



Tommy Byrne


 


Date and Place of Birth: December 31, 1919 Baltimore, Maryland


Died: December 20, 2007 Wake Forest, North Carolina


Baseball Experience: Major League
Position:
Pitcher
Rank:
Lieutenant
Military Unit:
US Navy


Area Served: Mediterranean Theater of Operations


 


Tommy Byrne


Thomas J “Tommy” Byrne was born on December 31, 1919 in Baltimore, Maryland. He attended Blessed Sacrament Elementary School and graduated from Baltimore City College High School. Byrne went to Wake Forest College in 1937 and played baseball. An outstanding left-handed pitcher and good hitter, Byrne signed with the New York Yankees after graduating in 1940. He was assigned to the Newark Bears of the International League where he finished the year with a 2-5 record and 4.70 ERA.


Byrne was 10-7 with the Bears in 1941, and really came alive in 1942 with a sensational 17-4 record and 3.10 ERA for MVP honors. He joined the Yankees in 1943 and made his major league debut on April 27 against the Boston Red Sox. Control problems hampered his early years and Byrne was 2-1 with the Yankees in 11 appearances walking 35 batters in 31 and two-thirds innings.


Before the year was out, Byrne was in military service with the Navy and commissioned an ensign in November 1943. Assigned to the Norfolk Naval Training Station in Virginia, Byrne had the opportunity to play baseball during the summer of 1944. He was 16-2 on the mound and a hard-hitting outfielder when not pitching.


Later in the year, Byrne served in the Mediterranean as a gunnery officer on the destroyer USS Ordronaux (DD-617). In support of the invasion of southern France, this was a busy time for the crew of the Ordronaux but Byrne had the opportunity to play the occasional game of baseball when the destroyer docked. One time he sent a postcard to Joe McCarthy noting that he had pitched a shutout, struck out ten, and walked no one. When it arrived, McCarthy held the postcard up in the dugout and showed it to reporters. "Wouldn't you know," he said, "Tommy Byrne has finally found the plate and he's only five thousand miles from Yankee Stadium."


Byrne had attained the rank of lieutenant when he was discharged from service in January 1946. He joined the Yankees for spring training in Panama in February but was used sparingly throughout the year. He made just four appearances and his only start was on June 25 when he was beaten by the Cleveland Indians.


The Yankees sent the 27-year-old to Kansas City in the American Association for 1947 where he regained his form with a 12-6 record and 3.26 ERA. Byrne was back with the Yankees in 1948 as a starter and reliever but earned a regular spot in the starting rotation for 1949. He was 15-7 that year and made an appearance in the World Series against the Brooklyn Dodgers.


Byrne was 15-9 in 1950 and an American League all-star selection but he was traded to the St Louis Browns in June 1951. He also pitched for the White Sox and Senators before returning to the Yankees in 1954. His finest season in the major leagues was during this second stint with the Yankees when, in 1955, he had a 16-5 record with a 3.15 ERA and a World Series win against the Dodgers.


Byrne continued to pitch in the major leagues until 1957. In a 13-year career, he compiled an 85-69 won-loss record and played on five world championship teams.


Tommy Byrne Day - September 2007


After baseball, Byrne returned to Wake Forest where he had made his home with his wife, Mary. His business endeavors included the oil business, farming operations, Byrne & Fish Clothing Stores, real estate development and the Wake Forest Country Club.


He was an active member of the local community and the first chairman of the Wake Forest Recreation Commission, a town commissioner, Wake Forest mayor and president of the Wake County Mayor’s Association.


Byrne was inducted in the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame, the Baltimore City College Hall of Fame, the Wake Forest University Sports Hall of Fame and the Maryland Sports Hall of Fame. He was presented the Wake Forest Birthplace Society Distinguished Service Award and a Tommy Byrne Day was held on September 9, 2007 on the grounds of the Wake Forest College Birthplace Museum.


Tommy Byrne, a hugely loved figure in the local area, passed away on December 20, 2007 in Wake Forest. He was 87 years old and is buried at Wake Forest Cemetery.

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4 years ago  ::  Nov 10, 2013 - 6:24PM #46
FW57Clipper51
Posts: 14,663

New York Yankees Reserve 1B/OF Steve Souchock



Steve Souchock


 


Date and Place of Birth: March 3, 1919 Yatesboro, Pennsylvania


 


Bronze Star



Died: July 28, 2002 Westland, Michigan


Baseball Experience: Major League
Position: First Base
Rank: First Sergeant


Military Unit: 691st Tank Destroyer Battalion 87th Infantry Division US Army


Area Served: European Theater of Operations


 





Image result for Steve Souchock baseball playerRelated image





Stephen “Steve” Souchock was born on March 3, 1919 in Yatesboro, Pennsylvania. He was working on the assembly line at the Ford factory and playing semi-pro football for the Dearborn Club in 1938. But it was his baseball playing that was attracting the most attention. He was scouted by New York Yankees’ scout Bill Skiff, and signed by the club in June 1939. He played at Greenburg in the Class D Penn State Association that year, finishing the season with the Yankees’ farm team at Easton.


 


In 1940 he was with Akron where he hit 25 home runs and by 1941 he had advanced to Norfolk of the Class B Piedmont League in 1941, and was playing Class A baseball with Binghamton of Eastern League in 1942. That year, Souchock was the Eastern League MVP and won league batting title with a .315 average.


 


The Yankees’ were looking at Souchock as being a possible replacement for Buddy Hassett at first base in 1943, but he entered military service in January of that year. He trained at Camp Lexington, Louisiana during 1943 and 1944, playing just 15 games for the camp team before being sent overseas to Europe with the 691st Tank Destroyer Battalion. He spent 16 months in France, Luxembourg, Belgium and Germany.


 


First Sergeant Souchock earned a Bronze Star in Europe as commander of a five-man gun crew, knocking out a couple of German tanks with their 90mm gun.


 


He returned home with five battle stars late in 1945. "The war cost me three important years," said Souchock, "as it did many ballplayers."


 


Souchock was discharged from military service on December 6, 1945, at Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania. He made his major league debut with the Yankees on May 25th. He played 47 games with New York that year and batted .302 with 2  homeruns.


 


During an eight-season major league career he also played for the White Sox and Tigers. In 1953, he batted .302 in 89 games with 46 RBIs and 11 home runs. A broken wrist in 1954 ended his effectiveness.


Image result for Steve Souchock baseball playerImage result for Steve Souchock baseball player


 


Steve Souchock passed away on July 28, 2002 in Plantation, Florida. He was 83 years old.

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3 weeks ago  ::  Nov 05, 2017 - 4:48PM #47
FW57Clipper51
Posts: 14,663

Doctor Robert Brown aka Bobby Brown Yankees INF


Image result for Robert Brown  baseball player


Brown, born in Seattle, Washington, attended Galileo Academy of Science and Technology in San Francisco, then Stanford University and UCLA before receiving his medical degree from Tulane University.


Sometimes known as "Golden Boy" during his baseball career, he played 548 regular-season games for the Yankees, with a lifetime batting average of .279 with 22 home runs. In addition, he appeared in four World Series (1947, 1949, 1950, 1951) for New York, batting .439 in 17 games. He batted left-handed and threw right-handed. He missed 1½ seasons due to military service during the Korean War.


Brown had a bases-loaded triple in Game 4 and a two-run triple in the championship-clinching Game 5 of the 1949 World Series. He tripled again in the final game of the 1950 World Series.


A famous apocryphal story that has made the rounds for years in baseball circles concerns the time when Brown's road roommate was star Yankee catcher Yogi Berra, who had little formal education. The two were reading in their hotel room one night—Berra a comic book and Brown his copy of Boyd's Pathology. Berra came to the end of his comic, tossed it aside, and asked Brown, "So, how is yours turning out?"


Brown is the last living member of the Yankees team that won the 1947 World Series. There are no living players who played on an earlier Yankees World Series-winning team.


Baseball Executive career


Brown practiced cardiology in the Dallas-Fort Worth area until the early 1980s, when he returned to baseball as a vice president of the AL Texas Rangers. In 1984, he succeeded Lee MacPhail as AL president and held the post for a decade; Gene Budig replaced him. In 1992 and 1993, Brown presented the World Series Trophy (on both occasions to the Toronto Blue Jays) instead of the Commissioner of Baseball. The presidencies of the American League and the National League were abolished in 2000 and their functions were absorbed into the office of the Commissioner of Baseball.


Legacy


A decorated veteran of two wars, a noted baseball player who served on five championship teams, an accomplished physician, and the former President of the American League, Brown is considered to have few equals in the history of major league baseball. He is a regular at the Yankees' annual Old-Timers' Day celebrations.

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3 weeks ago  ::  Nov 06, 2017 - 7:48AM #48
115by7and9in61
Posts: 6,851

Nov 5, 2017 -- 4:48PM, FW57Clipper51 wrote:


Doctor Robert Brown aka Bobby Brown Yankees INF


Image result for Robert Brown  baseball player


Brown, born in Seattle, Washington, attended Galileo Academy of Science and Technology in San Francisco, then Stanford University and UCLA before receiving his medical degree from Tulane University.


Sometimes known as "Golden Boy" during his baseball career, he played 548 regular-season games for the Yankees, with a lifetime batting average of .279 with 22 home runs. In addition, he appeared in four World Series (1947, 1949, 1950, 1951) for New York, batting .439 in 17 games. He batted left-handed and threw right-handed. He missed 1½ seasons due to military service during the Korean War.


Brown had a bases-loaded triple in Game 4 and a two-run triple in the championship-clinching Game 5 of the 1949 World Series. He tripled again in the final game of the 1950 World Series.


A famous apocryphal story that has made the rounds for years in baseball circles concerns the time when Brown's road roommate was star Yankee catcher Yogi Berra, who had little formal education. The two were reading in their hotel room one night—Berra a comic book and Brown his copy of Boyd's Pathology. Berra came to the end of his comic, tossed it aside, and asked Brown, "So, how is yours turning out?"


Brown is the last living member of the Yankees team that won the 1947 World Series. There are no living players who played on an earlier Yankees World Series-winning team.


Baseball Executive career


Brown practiced cardiology in the Dallas-Fort Worth area until the early 1980s, when he returned to baseball as a vice president of the AL Texas Rangers. In 1984, he succeeded Lee MacPhail as AL president and held the post for a decade; Gene Budig replaced him. In 1992 and 1993, Brown presented the World Series Trophy (on both occasions to the Toronto Blue Jays) instead of the Commissioner of Baseball. The presidencies of the American League and the National League were abolished in 2000 and their functions were absorbed into the office of the Commissioner of Baseball.


Legacy


A decorated veteran of two wars, a noted baseball player who served on five championship teams, an accomplished physician, and the former President of the American League, Brown is considered to have few equals in the history of major league baseball. He is a regular at the Yankees' annual Old-Timers' Day celebrations.




great addition Clipper, here is truly a great sports figure who is a remarkable role model...really nice photo

"...let it be known that as of this date in Major League Baseball history the one, truly honest single season home run record...61 in '61..."
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