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SWB Game - Gardner, Banuelos
2 years ago  ::  May 09, 2012 - 10:50AM #41
Stratocaster
Posts: 6,408

May 9, 2012 -- 10:08AM, BigGuy wrote:

May 9, 2012 -- 6:49AM, Stratocaster wrote:

RHP Adam Warren: 4.2 IP, 11 H, 3 R, 3 ER, 0 BB, 4 K, 2/2 GB/FB – 64 of 101 pitches were strikes (63.4%) … 44 hits allowed in 31.1 IP That line suggests he's getting behind in counts and rather than walking guys he's throwing some fat pitches that are getting hit? I haven't paid much attention to him so far, but that's what it looks like...at least last night.



That's what its looked like since last June after he got off to a very nice start.  This kid's got good enough stuff and better velocity than both Phelps and DJ, but his command hasn't been that sharp in the last 12 months now.  He gets behind in counts and then the hitters are just sitting there.  He beats himself.  I have to say I was excited when he was drafted because Webson clued me in on the kid.  He watched him pitch for NC during the college WS and was very impressed.  He had some ridiculous numbers like 22-4 at UNC, but he's been another disapointment so far. He's been in a word, mediocre.






Good stuff with command issues seems to be a familiar narrative at AAA since last season.  I'm starting to wonder what to attribute the sudden change to in some cases.  Betances I understand somewhat, but Banuelos never had that problem before, and given the UNC numbers you quoted I would think that wasn't a problem for Warren at one time either.  Is it the coaching?  Are they tinkering with stuff too much?

2 years ago  ::  May 09, 2012 - 10:53AM #42
BigGuy
Posts: 47,383

May 9, 2012 -- 10:50AM, Stratocaster wrote:

May 9, 2012 -- 10:08AM, BigGuy wrote:


May 9, 2012 -- 6:49AM, Stratocaster wrote:

RHP Adam Warren: 4.2 IP, 11 H, 3 R, 3 ER, 0 BB, 4 K, 2/2 GB/FB – 64 of 101 pitches were strikes (63.4%) … 44 hits allowed in 31.1 IP That line suggests he's getting behind in counts and rather than walking guys he's throwing some fat pitches that are getting hit? I haven't paid much attention to him so far, but that's what it looks like...at least last night.



That's what its looked like since last June after he got off to a very nice start.  This kid's got good enough stuff and better velocity than both Phelps and DJ, but his command hasn't been that sharp in the last 12 months now.  He gets behind in counts and then the hitters are just sitting there.  He beats himself.  I have to say I was excited when he was drafted because Webson clued me in on the kid.  He watched him pitch for NC during the college WS and was very impressed.  He had some ridiculous numbers like 22-4 at UNC, but he's been another disapointment so far. He's been in a word, mediocre.





Good stuff with command issues seems to be a familiar narrative at AAA since last season. I'm starting to wonder what to attribute the sudden change to in some cases. Betances I understand somewhat, but Banuelos never had that problem before, and given the UNC numbers you quoted I would think that wasn't a problem for Warren at one time either. Is it the coaching? Are they tinkering with stuff too much?



I really don't know what or who to blame for this, but it is a problem.  Betances of course is understandable since he's so damn tall.  His mechanics get messed up.  His best pitch so far this year has been his curve.  His FB is usually up in the zone for balls.  He doesn't look to me that he's following thru on his release point, but I'm not a pitching coach.  Banuelos I think became more of a nibbler last year when he was at AA and it carried over.  His first 2 starts were not good, but his last 2 in the past week since coming off the DL have been very good.  Warren's an enigma to me.  He's got everything it takes to be a good 3 starter but hasn't shown it.  If I'm the front office I'm starting to blame somebody, and Nardi Contreras has to be at the top of the list.

"Jay Z got him a big raise, but he also got him a 30-day vacation – it’s called October," --Pete Rose
2 years ago  ::  May 09, 2012 - 10:56AM #43
BigGuy
Posts: 47,383

Reasons to Be Optimistic About Phil Hughes




Photo

Peter G. Aiken-US PRESSWIRE - Presswire




Phil Hughes, for most of this season, has been extremely difficult to watch. He's shown inconsistent command, he hasn't been able to pitch deep into games, and at times, his stuff hasn't been sharp. Specifically, he was having a lot of trouble throwing his cutter, a pitch that had been highly successful for him as recently as 2010.


However, in 2012, with a lack of velocity and late action on his cutter, it became very frustrating for fans to watch him show poor command with it. On May 1st, through just a few starts, his cutter was already -2.0 runs below average. Therefore, after seeing his numbers, I tweeted that he should drop the cutter and go back to throwing a two-seamer, with the idea that he would still throw a fastball that moved. Going back to the two-seamer made sense to me: it offered an alternative to his pin-straight fastball and the last time he used it consistently, it sat just 0.2 mph slower than his fastball. Meanwhile, his cutter is sitting 6 mph slower than his average fastball in 2012.


In his last two starts, Hughes hasn't started throwing his two-seamer again (sort of), but he has stopped throwing his cutter and his average fastball velocity is up. Earlier in the season, Hughes threw his cutter well over 10% of the time, but in his last two outings, he's used the cutter just two times combined, one in each start. His cutter has essentially been a batting practice fastball, so lessening his dependance on it probably contributed to his recent (relevant) success.


Hughes has been far more effective than what he showed in early April, especially in his last start when he finally pitched into the seventh inning while striking out seven batters and sitting 93-95 mph with his fastball. It was nice to notice Phil throwing harder, and Eric Schultz (linked above), noticed it, too. That made him take a look at Hughes' velocity from start to start, and he found that it has improved in each of his last three starts. On April 19th, Hughes' average velocity on his fastball sat just under 91.5 mph, but in his most recent start, Hughes' average fastball sat at 93.34 mph, topping out at 95.6 mph.


In addition to the harder fastball, it has shown a bit more horizontal movement, which may have negated the necessity of a true two-seamer or cutter. As Schultz noted, his fastball had it's highest horizontal break of the season, -6.46, compared to his season average of -4.37. The extra two inches of horizontal break makes a huge difference, as more break makes it more difficult for batters to square up his usually pin-straight fastball.


Obviously, just one start with an improvement in the quality of his stuff is not enough for fans or management to hand him the keys to his rotation spot for the remainder of the season. He will need to show that he can maintain consistency in his pitches to stick in the rotation long-term, or at least in 2012. However, Hughes displayed that he has made progress, and there are certainly reasons to be optimistic about him. He's throwing his fastball harder, it's moving more, and he's seemingly eliminated a below average option from his repertoire of pitches.


Hopefully, he'll maintain his ability to strike batters out, command his harder and improved fastball, and continue to make positive strides. He has a long way to go, but we have to hope that his improvements will continue.


"Jay Z got him a big raise, but he also got him a 30-day vacation – it’s called October," --Pete Rose
2 years ago  ::  May 09, 2012 - 11:00AM #44
BigGuy
Posts: 47,383

Sweeny: Going One-On-One With Michael Pineda



(credit: Nick Laham/Getty Images)

By Sweeny Murti


While most of the talk around Yankee Stadium still revolved around Mariano Rivera and news spread of Andy Pettitte’s imminent return, Michael Pineda sat in the dugout Tuesday afternoon, his right arm in a sling, staring at the rain falling on the tarp-covered field. It was his first time inside Yankee Stadium since being traded here in January.


Unfortunately he was in street clothes, not pinstripe home whites.


Pineda recently underwent surgery to repair the torn labrum in his shoulder and he will not pitch in 2012. But he feels good and is eager to show Yankee fans the reason he was traded here in the first place.  I had a chance to chat with Pineda for a few minutes on Tuesday:


Q:  How do you feel right now?


A:  Right now I feel really good.


Q:  How disappointing is it to be here (at Yankee Stadium) and not being able to pitch?


A:  It’s a little hard for me, you know, because I was so excited in spring training to be coming to New York. It’s New York and I was so excited! But today I came here because I want to be here with my team… and I was excited today too because my father is coming with me to see the New York Yankees for the first time. So today is a big day for me.


Q:  We were told the surgery went well.  What did they tell you about your rehab and when you’ll be able to pitch again?


A:  I need to find out today. The doctor is coming and talking to the trainer to see exactly when and where I do my throwing program.


Q:  Is your hope that you’ll be ready to pitch next spring training?


A:  Yeah, the doctor before the surgery, he told me, “Hey no worries.  You can’t pitch this year, but I promise next year you’ll be ready 100 percent in spring training.” That’s what he told me before the surgery.


Q:  When you look back now, do you know about when you hurt yourself?


A:  No, I don’t know.  I think the first time (I felt something was) my last start in spring training. I tried to throw hard and I felt pain in my shoulder. I rested for a couple days and then when I started to play catch again I was feeling really good. But when I threw hard again I could feel pain again.


Q:  All the starts before that last one, we asked you a lot about your velocity. It wasn’t quite what it was last year and you just kept saying, “No, I’m fine.”  Do you still think now that you were fine all spring?


A:  Yeah, I was fine in spring training. I didn’t focus on my velocity. I focused a little more on my changeup. I was so excited because I had a great changeup and great slider and my fastball was 90-94. You know, it’s not bad. 97 is better, I know! But I said, “My power is here, I can throw my 97 in the middle of the season.” You know what I mean?


Q:  The way you finished last season, are you comfortable that your arm was fine at the end of last season?


A:  Sure, yeah. I never felt anything in my shoulder. Never. My arm all the time felt really good. The first time I had an injury in my arm was 2009 in my elbow. After that I did rehab for like two months, and after that I came back real strong and never felt anything in my arm. I threw all the time, threw many innings and my arm felt great. So, you know, it’s the life of a baseball player.


Q:  So the first time you felt anything was really wrong was that last start of spring training?


A:  Yes.


Q:  The Mariners are coming here this weekend.  Jesus Montero is playing for them and Hector Noesi is playing for them.  Is it hard to see that team come in here and not be able to pitch for the Yankees right now?


A:  You know, it’s a little hard. But I don’t want to think about it too much. It doesn’t matter. Michael Pineda is here (with New York). I can be ready, I can be ready next year.


Q:  So that’s all you’re looking forward to now?


A:  Yeah. It’s not my fault. It’s not my fault, because I want to play. It’s not my fault, it’s the life of a baseball player.


Q:  Do you think there’s anything you could have done differently, maybe in your training in the off-season that would have prevented this?


A:  No, no. I do the same thing every off-season. I did the same routine.


Q:  So there was nothing you did differently after pitching a long season in the majors?


A: No.


Q:  So you think this was just baseball and pitchers get hurt all the time?


A:  Yes.


Q: Is it going to be hard to watch for the rest of the year?


A:  It’s really hard. It’s… it’s okay. I’m a young guy, so I can keep working really hard and come back strong. That’s what I need. That’s it.


Q:  Yankee fans were really looking forward to seeing you pitch here.  Is there anything you’d like to say to them?


A:  I want to say I’m real sad for the Yankee fans that want to see me. But don’t worry, I’m going to stay here. And I’ll come back real strong. I’ll keep working really hard for my rehab and I’ll be the same Michael Pineda from 2011.


Sweeny Murti
www.twitter.com/YankeesWFAN

"Jay Z got him a big raise, but he also got him a 30-day vacation – it’s called October," --Pete Rose
2 years ago  ::  May 09, 2012 - 11:02AM #45
BigGuy
Posts: 47,383

How long can Yankees reliever David Robertson sustain his Houdini act?


Wednesday, May 09, 2012, 10:58 AM




david-robertson-new-york-yankees-0509.jpg.JPGDavid Robertson worked out a bases-loaded jam to earn a save for the Yankees Tuesday.

NEW YORK – Good morning, folks.


In today's Star-Ledger, we have a story about Andy Pettitte's return, which might not be as critical if the Yankees got more of the pitching that Ivan Nova provided in last night's 5-3 win over the Rays. In the notebook, Mariano Rivera is expected at the ballpark today to discuss his future. It could be complicated.


Columnist Jeff Bradley uses the occasion of this series with the division-rival Rays to look at baseball's new wild card rules. He also has a column on David Robertson, who notched his first save, though he did it in the most un-Mariano way possible.


For those who asked on Twitter, Robertson came out to the mound to “Sweet Home Alabama,” which is a bit less menacing that Rivera's “Enter Sandman.” But Robertson, a native of Alabama, said after the game he doesn't intend to change his entrance music.


***
Just my take: Things are going to get interesting for Robertson.


By working out of a bases loaded jam last night, Robertson preserved his 100 percent strand rate this season. He's basically picked up where he left off last year when he stranded an abnormally high 90 percent of baserunners*. It's pretty impressive.


It's also pretty unsustainable.


Sure, it's possible that Robertson establishes he has a typically higher strand rate than most pitchers. His ability to generate a ton of strikeouts seems to go along with that theory. But even if this is true, it's unreasonable to expect anybody to maintain a strand rate that's about 20 percent better than the typical pitcher.


Robertson's due to let a few of those baserunners score.


This is not to say that he's going to start getting shelled. Actually, even if his strand rate levels off, Robertson is a good enough pitcher to remain effective. His fastball/curveball combination is devastating. If his ERA begins to stray from Rivera-esque territory, he's a solid bet to keep racking up strikeouts, a quality that positions him to become a very good closer. It would also help if Robertson lowers his walk rate. On that front, he's doing well so far.


But the timing of this expected regression could make for some uneasy nights.


Whether or not Joe Girardi says it directly, Robertson is in effect stepping in for Rivera as the closer. If Robertson gives up a few runs and blows a few games in that role -- the numbers indicate there's a reasonable chance he will -- the natural inclination will be to chalk it up to Robertson not being able to handle the pressure of closing out games. Who knows? Maybe, the mental aspect actually does come into play.


However, what's more likely is that Robertson's run of exceedingly good luck simply comes to an end. And instead of being superhuman, he settles into being just really, really good. The Yankees would take that. Most teams would.


Anyway, it's something to keep in mind, especially as Robertson continues to get more chances to close out games. He's due to take some lumps. But it's also clear that he's established himself as a top-flight reliever. And the Yankees will see that part of Robertson, too.


* Robertson also has a freakishly low home-run rate dating back to last season. It's a good bet to rise this season.


For more Yankees coverage, follow Marc Carig on twitter at twitter.com/MarcCarig



Marc Carig: mcarig@starledger.com


"Jay Z got him a big raise, but he also got him a 30-day vacation – it’s called October," --Pete Rose
2 years ago  ::  May 09, 2012 - 1:26PM #46
BigGuy
Posts: 47,383

Phelps staying focused for second career start


David Phelps spent nearly a month in the big leagues before he made his first start. The Yankees had been impressed with his poise in spring training, he’d proven he could throw strikes and get outs as a reliever, but Phelps first start was something he didn’t expect. It was … different.


“My adrenalin was going a little bit more than I thought it would,” he said. “I hadn’t started since the one in spring training, but I was definitely a little more amped up than I thought I would be. … Just slow things down a little better (tonight). Take my time between pitches and just not let my emotions get the best of me.”


Tonight, Phelps makes his second career start knowing he might have to wait a while for his third. With Andy Pettitte coming back on Sunday, someone will have to fall out of the Yankees rotation. Phil Hughes might have been the natural choice two weeks ago, but he’s looked much better in his past two starts. Ivan Nova eliminated any chance of being on the bubble when he shutdown the Rays last night.


Whether in the rotation or out of the bullpen, Phelps is proving he can be a valuable pitcher for the Yankees this season. Even in that emotion-filled start in Kansas City, Phelps showed an ability to pitch out of trouble and limit the damage. He lasted just four innings, but he walked none and struck out five.


“I’m just going start to start with it,” Phelps said. “I’m just going out there thinking about (tonight) and hopefully let things take care of themselves. I’m just trying to worry as little about what’s going on around me as I can.”


Associated Press photo

"Jay Z got him a big raise, but he also got him a 30-day vacation – it’s called October," --Pete Rose
2 years ago  ::  May 09, 2012 - 1:28PM #47
BigGuy
Posts: 47,383

The Yankees top prospect, Manny Banuelos, saw mixed results in the early months of this season. The left handed pitcher emerged out of the early spring throwing an improved curveball and a new cutter to compliment his already plus fastball and changeup. For the 21 year old pitcher entering the 2012 season in Triple-A, his success was never questioned by the quality of his pitches, but instead contingent upon his command.


In three spring training outings, Banuelos inconsistently pushed across 4 walks in his 5.0 innings, and through his first two starts with Scranton, he went an atrocious 5.1 innings, giving up, 14 hits, 6 earned runs, 7 walks, and only 2 strikeouts. He threw an uninspiring 82 strikes out of 155 pitches, a 53% strike rate. Perhaps just as we thought he was heading down the Andrew Brackman nightmarish career path that culminated with the Yankees last year, Banuelos was sent to the disable list with back problems.


Scouting reports from before 2011 largely suggested that the youngster appeared to be a quick mover, and his success would rely on his ability to develop his third pitch, the curveball. The command problem was a non-issue for Banuelos, who’s worst seasonal walk rates topped out at 3.5 BB/9. Last year’s 4.9 BB/9 rate was the first instance that command would be a weakness, truly his only major blemish holding him back from huge projections. While some assumed that the move from facing single-A hitters to double-A hitters caused the spike in walks, some scouts believed that he still possessed the advanced command he sported in three prior seasons, but was trying to hit corners too often. Perhaps the flaw holding him back, isn’t a flaw at all.


While we won’t know the state of his command issues until sample sizes increase, his healthy return to the majors over the last week has resulted in walk rates we haven’t seen from him in a while. Although Banuelos is still in the process of being stretched out, since being activated off the disabled list, he’s gone 8.2 innings, giving up 6 hits, 1 run, 8 strikeouts, and 0 walks. Aside from these incredible numbers, his strike rate has also increased from 53% to 64%, as he threw 87 strikes in 135 pitches. The numbers are a very short sample size, but for his first two healthy starts in 2012, Banuelos has shown no signs of command issues.



If the lefty continues to show that his command is a non-issue, the best place for his progress would be the major leagues. For a lefty who’s next step appears to be developing the cutter, the major league Yankees are the best equipped team to develop the pitch. Mariano Rivera, the man who made a living out of throwing the best cutter in baseball, has obviously suffered a terrible season ending injury, but there could be a silver lining with him remaining with the team and lending his knowledge to the clubhouse. Along with Mo, Andy Pettitte’s return in pinstripes gives them one of the best lefty throwing pitchers to ever throw a cutter. Pairing Banuelos with Rivera and Pettitte could be a defining point in his career, something that might not be possible in the future. From a strictly development standpoint, there seems to be little more the 21 year old could learn outside of the majors if command is a clear non-issue by mid-season. Promoting Banuelos to the big leagues could happen sooner than we expect.

"Jay Z got him a big raise, but he also got him a 30-day vacation – it’s called October," --Pete Rose
2 years ago  ::  May 09, 2012 - 1:45PM #48
Stratocaster
Posts: 6,408

May 9, 2012 -- 1:28PM, BigGuy wrote:


The Yankees top prospect, Manny Banuelos, saw mixed results in the early months of this season. The left handed pitcher emerged out of the early spring throwing an improved curveball and a new cutter to compliment his already plus fastball and changeup. For the 21 year old pitcher entering the 2012 season in Triple-A, his success was never questioned by the quality of his pitches, but instead contingent upon his command.


In three spring training outings, Banuelos inconsistently pushed across 4 walks in his 5.0 innings, and through his first two starts with Scranton, he went an atrocious 5.1 innings, giving up, 14 hits, 6 earned runs, 7 walks, and only 2 strikeouts. He threw an uninspiring 82 strikes out of 155 pitches, a 53% strike rate. Perhaps just as we thought he was heading down the Andrew Brackman nightmarish career path that culminated with the Yankees last year, Banuelos was sent to the disable list with back problems.


Scouting reports from before 2011 largely suggested that the youngster appeared to be a quick mover, and his success would rely on his ability to develop his third pitch, the curveball. The command problem was a non-issue for Banuelos, who’s worst seasonal walk rates topped out at 3.5 BB/9. Last year’s 4.9 BB/9 rate was the first instance that command would be a weakness, truly his only major blemish holding him back from huge projections. While some assumed that the move from facing single-A hitters to double-A hitters caused the spike in walks, some scouts believed that he still possessed the advanced command he sported in three prior seasons, but was trying to hit corners too often. Perhaps the flaw holding him back, isn’t a flaw at all.


While we won’t know the state of his command issues until sample sizes increase, his healthy return to the majors over the last week has resulted in walk rates we haven’t seen from him in a while. Although Banuelos is still in the process of being stretched out, since being activated off the disabled list, he’s gone 8.2 innings, giving up 6 hits, 1 run, 8 strikeouts, and 0 walks. Aside from these incredible numbers, his strike rate has also increased from 53% to 64%, as he threw 87 strikes in 135 pitches. The numbers are a very short sample size, but for his first two healthy starts in 2012, Banuelos has shown no signs of command issues.



If the lefty continues to show that his command is a non-issue, the best place for his progress would be the major leagues. For a lefty who’s next step appears to be developing the cutter, the major league Yankees are the best equipped team to develop the pitch. Mariano Rivera, the man who made a living out of throwing the best cutter in baseball, has obviously suffered a terrible season ending injury, but there could be a silver lining with him remaining with the team and lending his knowledge to the clubhouse. Along with Mo, Andy Pettitte’s return in pinstripes gives them one of the best lefty throwing pitchers to ever throw a cutter. Pairing Banuelos with Rivera and Pettitte could be a defining point in his career, something that might not be possible in the future. From a strictly development standpoint, there seems to be little more the 21 year old could learn outside of the majors if command is a clear non-issue by mid-season. Promoting Banuelos to the big leagues could happen sooner than we expect.






Oh.... They're getting impatient me-thinks!  Two decent starts in a row?  Get him up here!! lol

Some of these bloggers should be forced to take remedial courses in grammar and punctuation, by the way.  Even when the subject matter is good, you find more crappy writing than I've ever seen in my life on some of these blogs.  This article is both off base and poorly written.  ;)

2 years ago  ::  May 09, 2012 - 1:48PM #49
BigGuy
Posts: 47,383

May 9, 2012 -- 1:45PM, Stratocaster wrote:

May 9, 2012 -- 1:28PM, BigGuy wrote:



The Yankees top prospect, Manny Banuelos, saw mixed results in the early months of this season. The left handed pitcher emerged out of the early spring throwing an improved curveball and a new cutter to compliment his already plus fastball and changeup. For the 21 year old pitcher entering the 2012 season in Triple-A, his success was never questioned by the quality of his pitches, but instead contingent upon his command.


In three spring training outings, Banuelos inconsistently pushed across 4 walks in his 5.0 innings, and through his first two starts with Scranton, he went an atrocious 5.1 innings, giving up, 14 hits, 6 earned runs, 7 walks, and only 2 strikeouts. He threw an uninspiring 82 strikes out of 155 pitches, a 53% strike rate. Perhaps just as we thought he was heading down the Andrew Brackman nightmarish career path that culminated with the Yankees last year, Banuelos was sent to the disable list with back problems.


Scouting reports from before 2011 largely suggested that the youngster appeared to be a quick mover, and his success would rely on his ability to develop his third pitch, the curveball. The command problem was a non-issue for Banuelos, who’s worst seasonal walk rates topped out at 3.5 BB/9. Last year’s 4.9 BB/9 rate was the first instance that command would be a weakness, truly his only major blemish holding him back from huge projections. While some assumed that the move from facing single-A hitters to double-A hitters caused the spike in walks, some scouts believed that he still possessed the advanced command he sported in three prior seasons, but was trying to hit corners too often. Perhaps the flaw holding him back, isn’t a flaw at all.


While we won’t know the state of his command issues until sample sizes increase, his healthy return to the majors over the last week has resulted in walk rates we haven’t seen from him in a while. Although Banuelos is still in the process of being stretched out, since being activated off the disabled list, he’s gone 8.2 innings, giving up 6 hits, 1 run, 8 strikeouts, and 0 walks. Aside from these incredible numbers, his strike rate has also increased from 53% to 64%, as he threw 87 strikes in 135 pitches. The numbers are a very short sample size, but for his first two healthy starts in 2012, Banuelos has shown no signs of command issues.



If the lefty continues to show that his command is a non-issue, the best place for his progress would be the major leagues. For a lefty who’s next step appears to be developing the cutter, the major league Yankees are the best equipped team to develop the pitch. Mariano Rivera, the man who made a living out of throwing the best cutter in baseball, has obviously suffered a terrible season ending injury, but there could be a silver lining with him remaining with the team and lending his knowledge to the clubhouse. Along with Mo, Andy Pettitte’s return in pinstripes gives them one of the best lefty throwing pitchers to ever throw a cutter. Pairing Banuelos with Rivera and Pettitte could be a defining point in his career, something that might not be possible in the future. From a strictly development standpoint, there seems to be little more the 21 year old could learn outside of the majors if command is a clear non-issue by mid-season. Promoting Banuelos to the big leagues could happen sooner than we expect.





Oh.... They're getting impatient me-thinks! Two decent starts in a row? Get him up here!! lol Some of these bloggers should be forced to take remedial courses in grammar and punctuation, by the way. Even when the subject matter is good, you find more crappy writing than I've ever seen in my life on some of these blogs. This article is both off base and poorly written. ;)



I agree.  2 good starts and he's the next Whitey Ford.  By all means, let's rush up another kid before he's ready.  You don't see Tampa doing that and it pays off for them.  If he was older maybe, but he just turned 21 2 months ago.  We may see him in Sept if they have roster room, but I don't think we'll see hiim before than unless something unforeseen happens in NY, and he keeps improving at SWB.  Lots of ifs there.

"Jay Z got him a big raise, but he also got him a 30-day vacation – it’s called October," --Pete Rose
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