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So glad Steinbrenner is "commited to winning"
2 months ago  ::  Oct 17, 2019 - 10:29PM #41
Paterson
Posts: 6,538

Oct 17, 2019 -- 2:23PM, Balboni wrote:


's

Oct 17, 2019 -- 1:07PM, cleanuphtr12 wrote:



Oct 16, 2019 -- 8:15PM, maplebats wrote:


snip





I honestly tried to read the entire post, but in the second paragraph when you started talking about Cashman "falling in love with power hitters who couldn't hit for power or average in the 2000's" and I just couldn't go through 7 more paragraphs if they were going to be that inaccurate.



The players that Cashman imported in the 2000's were NOT low average, low on base power hitters.  That's ridiculous revisionist history, and frankly it doesn't require ANY research to come up with a LONG list of high OB% players who could hit that he brought in:  



And you want to call other posters illogical?  At least I'm not completely rewriting history to make some narrative I created in my head fit.



- Jason Giambi was a .300+ hitter with insane on base skills when he came here.  


- AROD


- Hideki Matsui


- Gary Sheffield


- Johnny Damon 


- Bobby Abreu


- Nick Swisher was a relatively low average hitter, but he had consistently high OB%


- Teixeira was a consistent .280-.300 hitter before arriving here


- Granderson was another relatively low average hitter who had high OB%


- Ellsbury - doesn't fit your description even if he was a terrible signing.


- Beltran



Even some of the lesser known guys that you have to look up to remember they were Yankees don't fit the mold that you claim existed 


-Rondell White - career .288 hitter, hit .240 here.


- Robin Venture - high OB% hitter


- Kenny Lofton - contact hitter


- Eric Chavez, Raul Ibanez, the list goes on and on.



The Yankees didn't fail over the past two decades because they were bringing in poor hitters.  They had a string of consistent .280+ hitters with VERY good on base skills who JUST DIDN'T COME THROUGH IN THE PLAYOFFS.  The implication that they were importing a bunch of Chris Carter types consistently over that time period is just absurd.



And you want to say other posters are "illogical"?  At least we're not rewriting history to make a narrative fit.




Thanks for the readers digest version. Sitting in the Doctor's office now I just decided to read the whole thing. You made the right choice by quiting after the second paragraph it gets much worse after that. Here are my 2  favorite lines in his War and Peace post below 


"And please, don't reply with "hindsight is 20/20", because you don't know how I was screaming at my TV the moment these things were happening."


"I believe this team belongs more to me than it does to Boone, Cashman, and Steinbrenner. Fanatical thoughts, indeed, but I make keen observations on the way this franchise is handled"


The rest is just rambling and still not admitting that the the main reason they lost game 2 was that the offense only got 1 hit in 4 plus innings vs the Houston pen after getting Verlander out of the game.


Not in love with all of Boone's moves either like batting Garner 3rd just to break up the lefties, and shaking up the lineup for game 3 makes sense but Boone can't hit for them.


Bottom line is Houston is a better team with Verlander and Cole on the mound and if they continue to struggle against the Houston pen and lose this series, I don't know, it might just be because Houston is the better team as opposed to Boone's decisions.


That's my not so keen observation




    Was Houston the better team in 2017 ? 


2 months ago  ::  Oct 18, 2019 - 4:45AM #42
Jon
Posts: 711
From August 3:

empirewritesback.com/2019/08/03/new-york...

In the recent past, the Yankees have been connected to four frontline starters. Three of them are considered aces. One is an excellent pitcher. They are Max Scherzer,Justin Verlander Gerrit Cole, and Patrick Corbin. Each time they came available, the Yankees passed. Their reasons were different each time, but ultimately it came down to one issue with three of the four pitchers, money. 
2 months ago  ::  Oct 18, 2019 - 7:15AM #43
Tippy
Posts: 432

Where have you gone, Joe Dimaggio?

2 months ago  ::  Oct 18, 2019 - 11:15AM #44
Max
Posts: 2,973

Oct 18, 2019 -- 7:15AM, Tippy wrote:


Where have you gone, Joe Dimaggio?




He's in Heaven.

2 months ago  ::  Oct 18, 2019 - 11:21AM #45
Balboni
Posts: 260

Oct 17, 2019 -- 10:29PM, Paterson wrote:


Oct 17, 2019 -- 2:23PM, Balboni wrote:


's

Oct 17, 2019 -- 1:07PM, cleanuphtr12 wrote:



Oct 16, 2019 -- 8:15PM, maplebats wrote:


snip





I honestly tried to read the entire post, but in the second paragraph when you started talking about Cashman "falling in love with power hitters who couldn't hit for power or average in the 2000's" and I just couldn't go through 7 more paragraphs if they were going to be that inaccurate.



The players that Cashman imported in the 2000's were NOT low average, low on base power hitters.  That's ridiculous revisionist history, and frankly it doesn't require ANY research to come up with a LONG list of high OB% players who could hit that he brought in:  



And you want to call other posters illogical?  At least I'm not completely rewriting history to make some narrative I created in my head fit.



- Jason Giambi was a .300+ hitter with insane on base skills when he came here.  


- AROD


- Hideki Matsui


- Gary Sheffield


- Johnny Damon 


- Bobby Abreu


- Nick Swisher was a relatively low average hitter, but he had consistently high OB%


- Teixeira was a consistent .280-.300 hitter before arriving here


- Granderson was another relatively low average hitter who had high OB%


- Ellsbury - doesn't fit your description even if he was a terrible signing.


- Beltran



Even some of the lesser known guys that you have to look up to remember they were Yankees don't fit the mold that you claim existed 


-Rondell White - career .288 hitter, hit .240 here.


- Robin Venture - high OB% hitter


- Kenny Lofton - contact hitter


- Eric Chavez, Raul Ibanez, the list goes on and on.



The Yankees didn't fail over the past two decades because they were bringing in poor hitters.  They had a string of consistent .280+ hitters with VERY good on base skills who JUST DIDN'T COME THROUGH IN THE PLAYOFFS.  The implication that they were importing a bunch of Chris Carter types consistently over that time period is just absurd.



And you want to say other posters are "illogical"?  At least we're not rewriting history to make a narrative fit.




Thanks for the readers digest version. Sitting in the Doctor's office now I just decided to read the whole thing. You made the right choice by quiting after the second paragraph it gets much worse after that. Here are my 2  favorite lines in his War and Peace post below 


"And please, don't reply with "hindsight is 20/20", because you don't know how I was screaming at my TV the moment these things were happening."


"I believe this team belongs more to me than it does to Boone, Cashman, and Steinbrenner. Fanatical thoughts, indeed, but I make keen observations on the way this franchise is handled"


The rest is just rambling and still not admitting that the the main reason they lost game 2 was that the offense only got 1 hit in 4 plus innings vs the Houston pen after getting Verlander out of the game.


Not in love with all of Boone's moves either like batting Garner 3rd just to break up the lefties, and shaking up the lineup for game 3 makes sense but Boone can't hit for them.


Bottom line is Houston is a better team with Verlander and Cole on the mound and if they continue to struggle against the Houston pen and lose this series, I don't know, it might just be because Houston is the better team as opposed to Boone's decisions.


That's my not so keen observation




    Was Houston the better team in 2017 ? 





Yep, I would say Houston was the better team in 2017 but not by much, specifically because of Verlander. 2-0 with a 0.56 ERA. Basically forcing the Yanks to win 4 of 5 in the rest of the series. If Houston doesn't make that trade for Verlander much better chance of the Yanks winning that series.


The gap might be wider now because of having a second #1 in Cole.

2 months ago  ::  Oct 18, 2019 - 5:46PM #46
Jon
Posts: 711
2 months ago  ::  Oct 18, 2019 - 9:09PM #47
Rob
Posts: 390

Oct 16, 2019 -- 2:54PM, maplebats wrote:


Oct 16, 2019 -- 12:37AM, Jon wrote:


Verlander + Cole or Gray + Happ.


Steinbrenner: "We can't spend that much!"


Cashman: "Okay, well, Happ and Gray have better fWARs than those two anyway."




The currency to acquire Verlander and Cole was not dollars but prospects. This franchise was not then, and is not now, in a good position to overpay in prospects to acquire any veteran player. The Yankee payroll is the second-highest in baseball at $220M. $220M in payroll is one heck of an enormous commitment. Only the Red Sox are higher at $230M. The Astros and Nationals are at $168M. The Rays took the Astros to the edge of elimination and the Rays payroll is $64M. Obviously, there isn't a proportional correlation between amount of payroll and ability to field a championship. It isn't how much you spend, it's how well you spend it.


Since the earliest 2000's, I've said the same thing. Cashman knows how to build a team to win in the regular season. He is clueless when it comes to building teams that can win in the post season. Cashman loves the homerun. Think back to early in this season when we encountered the first wave of injuries. All of a sudden we saw LeMahieu, Urshela, Frazier, Judge and Gleyber lashing the ball to all parts of the field. Judge and Gleyber hit a combined 10 HRs in the month of April, but the patience and discipline at the plate was paying dividends. They were working deep into counts. They were not trying to do too much, hitting the ball where it was thrown, manufacturing runs by getting runners on base and having great at-bats with men in scoring position.


For some inexplicable reason, this Yankees offense in this ALCS has gotten completely away from the things that they did to win 103 games. I don't think we can truly know anymore whether this is because of a directive from Brian Cashman or from Aaron Boone, but someone has made some terrible decisions that have not given the team its maximum chances to win. None of the blame falls on the Yankees pitching. For the most part (ie - except Ottavino), the Yankees pitching has done its job. The Yankees offense has been dreadful, swinging at the first pitch, swinging at pitches well out of the zone. Every bad habit that these Yankees hitters shook off this year has suddenly come back in full force in this ALCS. Boone and some of his coaches have had an absolutely horrendous approach to this ALCS. Is Boone under orders from Cashman? Who knows, but the Yankees have blown many huge opportunities in this ALCS, and none of it is the fault of the pitching staff or owner Hal Steinbrenner.




I'm curious.  How does a GM build a team that hits .294 with RISP during the regular season, (to lead the MLB) and almost as well in the ALDS and into the first game of the ALCS but under .200 in the ALCS?

2 months ago  ::  Oct 18, 2019 - 9:20PM #48
davis2
Posts: 17,487

Oct 18, 2019 -- 11:21AM, Balboni wrote:


Oct 17, 2019 -- 10:29PM, Paterson wrote:


Oct 17, 2019 -- 2:23PM, Balboni wrote:


's

Oct 17, 2019 -- 1:07PM, cleanuphtr12 wrote:



Oct 16, 2019 -- 8:15PM, maplebats wrote:


snip





I honestly tried to read the entire post, but in the second paragraph when you started talking about Cashman "falling in love with power hitters who couldn't hit for power or average in the 2000's" and I just couldn't go through 7 more paragraphs if they were going to be that inaccurate.



The players that Cashman imported in the 2000's were NOT low average, low on base power hitters.  That's ridiculous revisionist history, and frankly it doesn't require ANY research to come up with a LONG list of high OB% players who could hit that he brought in:  



And you want to call other posters illogical?  At least I'm not completely rewriting history to make some narrative I created in my head fit.



- Jason Giambi was a .300+ hitter with insane on base skills when he came here.  


- AROD


- Hideki Matsui


- Gary Sheffield


- Johnny Damon 


- Bobby Abreu


- Nick Swisher was a relatively low average hitter, but he had consistently high OB%


- Teixeira was a consistent .280-.300 hitter before arriving here


- Granderson was another relatively low average hitter who had high OB%


- Ellsbury - doesn't fit your description even if he was a terrible signing.


- Beltran



Even some of the lesser known guys that you have to look up to remember they were Yankees don't fit the mold that you claim existed 


-Rondell White - career .288 hitter, hit .240 here.


- Robin Venture - high OB% hitter


- Kenny Lofton - contact hitter


- Eric Chavez, Raul Ibanez, the list goes on and on.



The Yankees didn't fail over the past two decades because they were bringing in poor hitters.  They had a string of consistent .280+ hitters with VERY good on base skills who JUST DIDN'T COME THROUGH IN THE PLAYOFFS.  The implication that they were importing a bunch of Chris Carter types consistently over that time period is just absurd.



And you want to say other posters are "illogical"?  At least we're not rewriting history to make a narrative fit.




Thanks for the readers digest version. Sitting in the Doctor's office now I just decided to read the whole thing. You made the right choice by quiting after the second paragraph it gets much worse after that. Here are my 2  favorite lines in his War and Peace post below 


"And please, don't reply with "hindsight is 20/20", because you don't know how I was screaming at my TV the moment these things were happening."


"I believe this team belongs more to me than it does to Boone, Cashman, and Steinbrenner. Fanatical thoughts, indeed, but I make keen observations on the way this franchise is handled"


The rest is just rambling and still not admitting that the the main reason they lost game 2 was that the offense only got 1 hit in 4 plus innings vs the Houston pen after getting Verlander out of the game.


Not in love with all of Boone's moves either like batting Garner 3rd just to break up the lefties, and shaking up the lineup for game 3 makes sense but Boone can't hit for them.


Bottom line is Houston is a better team with Verlander and Cole on the mound and if they continue to struggle against the Houston pen and lose this series, I don't know, it might just be because Houston is the better team as opposed to Boone's decisions.


That's my not so keen observation




    Was Houston the better team in 2017 ? 





Yep, I would say Houston was the better team in 2017 but not by much, specifically because of Verlander. 2-0 with a 0.56 ERA. Basically forcing the Yanks to win 4 of 5 in the rest of the series. If Houston doesn't make that trade for Verlander much better chance of the Yanks winning that series.


The gap might be wider now because of having a second #1 in Cole.



You're right there. We've needed another top starter for years now. They need to suck it up and get one.

2 months ago  ::  Oct 20, 2019 - 8:32AM #49
Jon
Posts: 711
The thing is, it's the same old story since this son took over.

The New York Stand Pats.
2 months ago  ::  Oct 20, 2019 - 5:03PM #50
qwik3457
Posts: 11,935

Oct 18, 2019 -- 9:09PM, Rob wrote:


I'm curious.  How does a GM build a team that hits .294 with RISP during the regular season, (to lead the MLB) and almost as well in the ALDS and into the first game of the ALCS but under .200 in the ALCS?




Opposing elite pitching explains that. You'd be surprised if you ever saw the BAVG w/RISP of the 1996 and 1998 Yankees' championship teams. I know I was when I researched it about 10 years ago.

Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
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