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So glad Steinbrenner is "commited to winning"
2 months ago  ::  Oct 20, 2019 - 9:45PM #51
Rob
Posts: 392

Oct 20, 2019 -- 5:03PM, qwik3457 wrote:


Oct 18, 2019 -- 9:09PM, Rob wrote:


I'm curious.  How does a GM build a team that hits .294 with RISP during the regular season, (to lead the MLB) and almost as well in the ALDS and into the first game of the ALCS but under .200 in the ALCS?




Opposing elite pitching explains that. You'd be surprised if you ever saw the BAVG w/RISP of the 1996 and 1998 Yankees' championship teams. I know I was when I researched it about 10 years ago.




Of course the fact that you are generally facing only very good pitching in the post season is a major reason offense is often stifled compared to regular season numbers.  You don't get to beat up on the Baltimores of MLB in the post season.  My query to the original post was that the poster seemed to imply you need one kind of offense to win in the regular season and another to win in the post season.  Nope.  What you need is for players go at least approximate what they did in the regular season on into the post season.



Interestingly, Houston's BA with RISP was even lower than that of the Yanks.  The difference was that of the few hits they did get with RISP, several were 3 run HRs.

2 months ago  ::  Oct 20, 2019 - 10:03PM #52
Secretagent
Posts: 48

Oct 20, 2019 -- 9:45PM, Rob wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 5:03PM, qwik3457 wrote:


Oct 18, 2019 -- 9:09PM, Rob wrote:


I'm curious.  How does a GM build a team that hits .294 with RISP during the regular season, (to lead the MLB) and almost as well in the ALDS and into the first game of the ALCS but under .200 in the ALCS?




Opposing elite pitching explains that. You'd be surprised if you ever saw the BAVG w/RISP of the 1996 and 1998 Yankees' championship teams. I know I was when I researched it about 10 years ago.




Of course the fact that you are generally facing only very good pitching in the post season is a major reason offense is often stifled compared to regular season numbers.  You don't get to beat up on the Baltimores of MLB in the post season.  My query to the original post was that the poster seemed to imply you need one kind of offense to win in the regular season and another to win in the post season.  Nope.  What you need is for players go at least approximate what they did in the regular season on into the post season.



Interestingly, Houston's BA with RISP was even lower than that of the Yanks.  The difference was that of the few hits they did get with RISP, several were 3 run HRs.





Actually, what you need is players on offense who have fundamentally sound approaches to hitting and understand situational hitting.  Players like that will succeed because they approach the game properly.  Guys like DJL and Torres and Hicks are fundamentally sound.  DJL is a contact, put the ball in play guy.  Torres changes his approach to the situation and count.  Hicks is a very disciplined hitter at the plate often taking a lot of pitches and drawing walks.  Compare that to Sanchez, EE, Didi, etc.   Sanchez is the opposite, fundamentally flawed, high-k guess hitter.  Easily defeated if you make the right pitch and post-season pitchers tend to do that.   EE is always trying to hit a Hr and has a lot of holes he can be beat at (esp now that he is getting older).  Didi never saw a pitch he would not swing at.  Yeah the latter types can beat up on the Os and Jays staffs and the Twins staff for that matter, but against top flight pitching, they will likely be shut down.  This has been an issue with the Yanks lineup for years.  Remember Swisher lol.  Or Sheffield. 


As to Houston's RISP, comes down to bad pitching\bad executrion of the pitching.  You hang sliders in the middle of the plate and good hitters will make you pay.  Luck that they are 2 or 3 run homers has really nothing to do with it.  The pitcher screwed up and paid for it.  You run out 5-6-7 pitchers on any given night and the probabilty is one or more of them will not be sharp and make mistakes\hang breaking pitches, etc.  Have a top starter that goes 7+ and you only need 1 or 2 relievers to close it out.  2 or 3 points of failure vs 5+.  Add in the obvious fact  that the guys in the BP are in the BP for a reason (esp the ones at the back end). 

2 months ago  ::  Oct 20, 2019 - 10:32PM #53
davis2
Posts: 17,487

Oct 20, 2019 -- 10:03PM, Secretagent wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 9:45PM, Rob wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 5:03PM, qwik3457 wrote:


Oct 18, 2019 -- 9:09PM, Rob wrote:


I'm curious.  How does a GM build a team that hits .294 with RISP during the regular season, (to lead the MLB) and almost as well in the ALDS and into the first game of the ALCS but under .200 in the ALCS?




Opposing elite pitching explains that. You'd be surprised if you ever saw the BAVG w/RISP of the 1996 and 1998 Yankees' championship teams. I know I was when I researched it about 10 years ago.




Of course the fact that you are generally facing only very good pitching in the post season is a major reason offense is often stifled compared to regular season numbers.  You don't get to beat up on the Baltimores of MLB in the post season.  My query to the original post was that the poster seemed to imply you need one kind of offense to win in the regular season and another to win in the post season.  Nope.  What you need is for players go at least approximate what they did in the regular season on into the post season.



Interestingly, Houston's BA with RISP was even lower than that of the Yanks.  The difference was that of the few hits they did get with RISP, several were 3 run HRs.





Actually, what you need is players on offense who have fundamentally sound approaches to hitting and understand situational hitting.  Players like that will succeed because they approach the game properly.  Guys like DJL and Torres and Hicks are fundamentally sound.  DJL is a contact, put the ball in play guy.  Torres changes his approach to the situation and count.  Hicks is a very disciplined hitter at the plate often taking a lot of pitches and drawing walks.  Compare that to Sanchez, EE, Didi, etc.   Sanchez is the opposite, fundamentally flawed, high-k guess hitter.  Easily defeated if you make the right pitch and post-season pitchers tend to do that.   EE is always trying to hit a Hr and has a lot of holes he can be beat at (esp now that he is getting older).  Didi never saw a pitch he would not swing at.  Yeah the latter types can beat up on the Os and Jays staffs and the Twins staff for that matter, but against top flight pitching, they will likely be shut down.  This has been an issue with the Yanks lineup for years.  Remember Swisher lol.  Or Sheffield. 


As to Houston's RISP, comes down to bad pitching\bad executrion of the pitching.  You hang sliders in the middle of the plate and good hitters will make you pay.  Luck that they are 2 or 3 run homers has really nothing to do with it.  The pitcher screwed up and paid for it.  You run out 5-6-7 pitchers on any given night and the probabilty is one or more of them will not be sharp and make mistakes\hang breaking pitches, etc.  Have a top starter that goes 7+ and you only need 1 or 2 relievers to close it out.  2 or 3 points of failure vs 5+.  Add in the obvious fact  that the guys in the BP are in the BP for a reason (esp the ones at the back end). 



Agree fully about the hitting philosophy. I get so pizzed off at the post season failures, especially the chasing of low/outside pitches by the same guys repeatedly! The coaches should have the ability to correct that, and the players should pull their head out of their orifices!


 Houston did do a bit better when they really needed to. The analytics has Boone pulling guys too early. How do they navigate an order later in the game if they seldom get the chance? Yes the analytics discover the problem, but the pitchers should be working longer during the season, especially considering how many runs the hitters put up...

2 months ago  ::  Oct 20, 2019 - 10:53PM #54
Secretagent
Posts: 48

Oct 20, 2019 -- 10:32PM, davis2 wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 10:03PM, Secretagent wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 9:45PM, Rob wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 5:03PM, qwik3457 wrote:


Oct 18, 2019 -- 9:09PM, Rob wrote:


I'm curious.  How does a GM build a team that hits .294 with RISP during the regular season, (to lead the MLB) and almost as well in the ALDS and into the first game of the ALCS but under .200 in the ALCS?




Opposing elite pitching explains that. You'd be surprised if you ever saw the BAVG w/RISP of the 1996 and 1998 Yankees' championship teams. I know I was when I researched it about 10 years ago.




Of course the fact that you are generally facing only very good pitching in the post season is a major reason offense is often stifled compared to regular season numbers.  You don't get to beat up on the Baltimores of MLB in the post season.  My query to the original post was that the poster seemed to imply you need one kind of offense to win in the regular season and another to win in the post season.  Nope.  What you need is for players go at least approximate what they did in the regular season on into the post season.



Interestingly, Houston's BA with RISP was even lower than that of the Yanks.  The difference was that of the few hits they did get with RISP, several were 3 run HRs.





Actually, what you need is players on offense who have fundamentally sound approaches to hitting and understand situational hitting.  Players like that will succeed because they approach the game properly.  Guys like DJL and Torres and Hicks are fundamentally sound.  DJL is a contact, put the ball in play guy.  Torres changes his approach to the situation and count.  Hicks is a very disciplined hitter at the plate often taking a lot of pitches and drawing walks.  Compare that to Sanchez, EE, Didi, etc.   Sanchez is the opposite, fundamentally flawed, high-k guess hitter.  Easily defeated if you make the right pitch and post-season pitchers tend to do that.   EE is always trying to hit a Hr and has a lot of holes he can be beat at (esp now that he is getting older).  Didi never saw a pitch he would not swing at.  Yeah the latter types can beat up on the Os and Jays staffs and the Twins staff for that matter, but against top flight pitching, they will likely be shut down.  This has been an issue with the Yanks lineup for years.  Remember Swisher lol.  Or Sheffield. 


As to Houston's RISP, comes down to bad pitching\bad executrion of the pitching.  You hang sliders in the middle of the plate and good hitters will make you pay.  Luck that they are 2 or 3 run homers has really nothing to do with it.  The pitcher screwed up and paid for it.  You run out 5-6-7 pitchers on any given night and the probabilty is one or more of them will not be sharp and make mistakes\hang breaking pitches, etc.  Have a top starter that goes 7+ and you only need 1 or 2 relievers to close it out.  2 or 3 points of failure vs 5+.  Add in the obvious fact  that the guys in the BP are in the BP for a reason (esp the ones at the back end). 



Agree fully about the hitting philosophy. I get so pizzed off at the post season failures, especially the chasing of low/outside pitches by the same guys repeatedly! The coaches should have the ability to correct that, and the players should pull their head out of their orifices!


 Houston did do a bit better when they really needed to. The analytics has Boone pulling guys too early. How do they navigate an order later in the game if they seldom get the chance? Yes the analytics discover the problem, but the pitchers should be working longer during the season, especially considering how many runs the hitters put up...





One of the major problems in this era is that the stats are driving the response and not common sense.  The analytics are worthless sometimes.  You do not need analytics to see Ottovino stunk, Sanchez was clueless, EE next to clueless, Paxton pulled too early in his first start, some others pulled to soon.  The eye test and commons sense has to apply.  As to pitchers working longer, I agree, but the analytics guys always blather about how numbers go down the third time through the lineup, so teams pull pitchers when it occurs whether they are doing well or not.  Of course common sense will tell you that all pitchers do worse as the game progresses generally, but the solution to that is not to pull them before they run out of gas\while they are still effective but to pull them when they start to become ineffective\get as much out of them as possible.  Again, cart before the horse.  The stats say he will go bad, so let's pull him...does not always work that way and how hard is it to have someone warming up and go batter to batter?  But in this era, the stats are driving the strategy and in the case of the pitching, it has led to the "quest for the inefffective reliever" strategy as I like to call it.  Let's run out some guy from the bullpen who is neither good enough to start nor good enough to close or even setup instead.


2 months ago  ::  Oct 20, 2019 - 11:05PM #55
davis2
Posts: 17,487

Oct 20, 2019 -- 10:53PM, Secretagent wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 10:32PM, davis2 wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 10:03PM, Secretagent wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 9:45PM, Rob wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 5:03PM, qwik3457 wrote:


Oct 18, 2019 -- 9:09PM, Rob wrote:


I'm curious.  How does a GM build a team that hits .294 with RISP during the regular season, (to lead the MLB) and almost as well in the ALDS and into the first game of the ALCS but under .200 in the ALCS?




Opposing elite pitching explains that. You'd be surprised if you ever saw the BAVG w/RISP of the 1996 and 1998 Yankees' championship teams. I know I was when I researched it about 10 years ago.




Of course the fact that you are generally facing only very good pitching in the post season is a major reason offense is often stifled compared to regular season numbers.  You don't get to beat up on the Baltimores of MLB in the post season.  My query to the original post was that the poster seemed to imply you need one kind of offense to win in the regular season and another to win in the post season.  Nope.  What you need is for players go at least approximate what they did in the regular season on into the post season.



Interestingly, Houston's BA with RISP was even lower than that of the Yanks.  The difference was that of the few hits they did get with RISP, several were 3 run HRs.





Actually, what you need is players on offense who have fundamentally sound approaches to hitting and understand situational hitting.  Players like that will succeed because they approach the game properly.  Guys like DJL and Torres and Hicks are fundamentally sound.  DJL is a contact, put the ball in play guy.  Torres changes his approach to the situation and count.  Hicks is a very disciplined hitter at the plate often taking a lot of pitches and drawing walks.  Compare that to Sanchez, EE, Didi, etc.   Sanchez is the opposite, fundamentally flawed, high-k guess hitter.  Easily defeated if you make the right pitch and post-season pitchers tend to do that.   EE is always trying to hit a Hr and has a lot of holes he can be beat at (esp now that he is getting older).  Didi never saw a pitch he would not swing at.  Yeah the latter types can beat up on the Os and Jays staffs and the Twins staff for that matter, but against top flight pitching, they will likely be shut down.  This has been an issue with the Yanks lineup for years.  Remember Swisher lol.  Or Sheffield. 


As to Houston's RISP, comes down to bad pitching\bad executrion of the pitching.  You hang sliders in the middle of the plate and good hitters will make you pay.  Luck that they are 2 or 3 run homers has really nothing to do with it.  The pitcher screwed up and paid for it.  You run out 5-6-7 pitchers on any given night and the probabilty is one or more of them will not be sharp and make mistakes\hang breaking pitches, etc.  Have a top starter that goes 7+ and you only need 1 or 2 relievers to close it out.  2 or 3 points of failure vs 5+.  Add in the obvious fact  that the guys in the BP are in the BP for a reason (esp the ones at the back end). 



Agree fully about the hitting philosophy. I get so pizzed off at the post season failures, especially the chasing of low/outside pitches by the same guys repeatedly! The coaches should have the ability to correct that, and the players should pull their head out of their orifices!


 Houston did do a bit better when they really needed to. The analytics has Boone pulling guys too early. How do they navigate an order later in the game if they seldom get the chance? Yes the analytics discover the problem, but the pitchers should be working longer during the season, especially considering how many runs the hitters put up...





One of the major problems in this era is that the stats are driving the response and not common sense.  The analytics are worthless sometimes.  You do not need analytics to see Ottovino stunk, Sanchez was clueless, EE next to clueless, Paxton pulled too early in his first start, some others pulled to soon.  The eye test and commons sense has to apply.  As to pitchers working longer, I agree, but the analytics guys always blather about how numbers go down the third time through the lineup, so teams pull pitchers when it occurs whether they are doing well or not.  Of course common sense will tell you that all pitchers do worse as the game progresses generally, but the solution to that is not to pull them before they run out of gas\while they are still effective but to pull them when they start to become ineffective\get as much out of them as possible.  Again, cart before the horse.  The stats say he will go bad, so let's pull him...does not always work that way and how hard is it to have someone warming up and go batter to batter?  But in this era, the stats are driving the strategy and in the case of the pitching, it has led to the "quest for the inefffective reliever" strategy as I like to call it.  Let's run out some guy from the bullpen who is neither good enough to start nor good enough to close or even setup instead.




The analytics are good at uncovering things about the game that have been overlooked. Things that should affect player usage, or providing information that those players could use to improve. I like the idea of batter to batter the third time through. Just pulling a guy sucks. But what the hell do we know?

2 months ago  ::  Oct 20, 2019 - 11:13PM #56
Secretagent
Posts: 48

Oct 20, 2019 -- 11:05PM, davis2 wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 10:53PM, Secretagent wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 10:32PM, davis2 wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 10:03PM, Secretagent wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 9:45PM, Rob wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 5:03PM, qwik3457 wrote:


Oct 18, 2019 -- 9:09PM, Rob wrote:


I'm curious.  How does a GM build a team that hits .294 with RISP during the regular season, (to lead the MLB) and almost as well in the ALDS and into the first game of the ALCS but under .200 in the ALCS?




Opposing elite pitching explains that. You'd be surprised if you ever saw the BAVG w/RISP of the 1996 and 1998 Yankees' championship teams. I know I was when I researched it about 10 years ago.




Of course the fact that you are generally facing only very good pitching in the post season is a major reason offense is often stifled compared to regular season numbers.  You don't get to beat up on the Baltimores of MLB in the post season.  My query to the original post was that the poster seemed to imply you need one kind of offense to win in the regular season and another to win in the post season.  Nope.  What you need is for players go at least approximate what they did in the regular season on into the post season.



Interestingly, Houston's BA with RISP was even lower than that of the Yanks.  The difference was that of the few hits they did get with RISP, several were 3 run HRs.





Actually, what you need is players on offense who have fundamentally sound approaches to hitting and understand situational hitting.  Players like that will succeed because they approach the game properly.  Guys like DJL and Torres and Hicks are fundamentally sound.  DJL is a contact, put the ball in play guy.  Torres changes his approach to the situation and count.  Hicks is a very disciplined hitter at the plate often taking a lot of pitches and drawing walks.  Compare that to Sanchez, EE, Didi, etc.   Sanchez is the opposite, fundamentally flawed, high-k guess hitter.  Easily defeated if you make the right pitch and post-season pitchers tend to do that.   EE is always trying to hit a Hr and has a lot of holes he can be beat at (esp now that he is getting older).  Didi never saw a pitch he would not swing at.  Yeah the latter types can beat up on the Os and Jays staffs and the Twins staff for that matter, but against top flight pitching, they will likely be shut down.  This has been an issue with the Yanks lineup for years.  Remember Swisher lol.  Or Sheffield. 


As to Houston's RISP, comes down to bad pitching\bad executrion of the pitching.  You hang sliders in the middle of the plate and good hitters will make you pay.  Luck that they are 2 or 3 run homers has really nothing to do with it.  The pitcher screwed up and paid for it.  You run out 5-6-7 pitchers on any given night and the probabilty is one or more of them will not be sharp and make mistakes\hang breaking pitches, etc.  Have a top starter that goes 7+ and you only need 1 or 2 relievers to close it out.  2 or 3 points of failure vs 5+.  Add in the obvious fact  that the guys in the BP are in the BP for a reason (esp the ones at the back end). 



Agree fully about the hitting philosophy. I get so pizzed off at the post season failures, especially the chasing of low/outside pitches by the same guys repeatedly! The coaches should have the ability to correct that, and the players should pull their head out of their orifices!


 Houston did do a bit better when they really needed to. The analytics has Boone pulling guys too early. How do they navigate an order later in the game if they seldom get the chance? Yes the analytics discover the problem, but the pitchers should be working longer during the season, especially considering how many runs the hitters put up...





One of the major problems in this era is that the stats are driving the response and not common sense.  The analytics are worthless sometimes.  You do not need analytics to see Ottovino stunk, Sanchez was clueless, EE next to clueless, Paxton pulled too early in his first start, some others pulled to soon.  The eye test and commons sense has to apply.  As to pitchers working longer, I agree, but the analytics guys always blather about how numbers go down the third time through the lineup, so teams pull pitchers when it occurs whether they are doing well or not.  Of course common sense will tell you that all pitchers do worse as the game progresses generally, but the solution to that is not to pull them before they run out of gas\while they are still effective but to pull them when they start to become ineffective\get as much out of them as possible.  Again, cart before the horse.  The stats say he will go bad, so let's pull him...does not always work that way and how hard is it to have someone warming up and go batter to batter?  But in this era, the stats are driving the strategy and in the case of the pitching, it has led to the "quest for the inefffective reliever" strategy as I like to call it.  Let's run out some guy from the bullpen who is neither good enough to start nor good enough to close or even setup instead.




The analytics are good at uncovering things about the game that have been overlooked. Things that should affect player usage, or providing information that those players could use to improve. I like the idea of batter to batter the third time through. Just pulling a guy sucks. But what the hell do we know?





The game has been around for over 100 years.  I have watched many 1000s of games.  Stats are a tool.  Like any tool, if used properly are a benefit.  If misinterpreted or used ineffectively, they can be a curse.  Stats should never replace common sense or what the eyes see that are ovbious.  As the sayings goes:  "Figures lie and liars figure" or "Lies, damned lies, and statistics".




2 months ago  ::  Oct 20, 2019 - 11:24PM #57
davis2
Posts: 17,487

Oct 20, 2019 -- 11:13PM, Secretagent wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 11:05PM, davis2 wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 10:53PM, Secretagent wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 10:32PM, davis2 wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 10:03PM, Secretagent wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 9:45PM, Rob wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 5:03PM, qwik3457 wrote:


Oct 18, 2019 -- 9:09PM, Rob wrote:


I'm curious.  How does a GM build a team that hits .294 with RISP during the regular season, (to lead the MLB) and almost as well in the ALDS and into the first game of the ALCS but under .200 in the ALCS?




Opposing elite pitching explains that. You'd be surprised if you ever saw the BAVG w/RISP of the 1996 and 1998 Yankees' championship teams. I know I was when I researched it about 10 years ago.




Of course the fact that you are generally facing only very good pitching in the post season is a major reason offense is often stifled compared to regular season numbers.  You don't get to beat up on the Baltimores of MLB in the post season.  My query to the original post was that the poster seemed to imply you need one kind of offense to win in the regular season and another to win in the post season.  Nope.  What you need is for players go at least approximate what they did in the regular season on into the post season.



Interestingly, Houston's BA with RISP was even lower than that of the Yanks.  The difference was that of the few hits they did get with RISP, several were 3 run HRs.





Actually, what you need is players on offense who have fundamentally sound approaches to hitting and understand situational hitting.  Players like that will succeed because they approach the game properly.  Guys like DJL and Torres and Hicks are fundamentally sound.  DJL is a contact, put the ball in play guy.  Torres changes his approach to the situation and count.  Hicks is a very disciplined hitter at the plate often taking a lot of pitches and drawing walks.  Compare that to Sanchez, EE, Didi, etc.   Sanchez is the opposite, fundamentally flawed, high-k guess hitter.  Easily defeated if you make the right pitch and post-season pitchers tend to do that.   EE is always trying to hit a Hr and has a lot of holes he can be beat at (esp now that he is getting older).  Didi never saw a pitch he would not swing at.  Yeah the latter types can beat up on the Os and Jays staffs and the Twins staff for that matter, but against top flight pitching, they will likely be shut down.  This has been an issue with the Yanks lineup for years.  Remember Swisher lol.  Or Sheffield. 


As to Houston's RISP, comes down to bad pitching\bad executrion of the pitching.  You hang sliders in the middle of the plate and good hitters will make you pay.  Luck that they are 2 or 3 run homers has really nothing to do with it.  The pitcher screwed up and paid for it.  You run out 5-6-7 pitchers on any given night and the probabilty is one or more of them will not be sharp and make mistakes\hang breaking pitches, etc.  Have a top starter that goes 7+ and you only need 1 or 2 relievers to close it out.  2 or 3 points of failure vs 5+.  Add in the obvious fact  that the guys in the BP are in the BP for a reason (esp the ones at the back end). 



Agree fully about the hitting philosophy. I get so pizzed off at the post season failures, especially the chasing of low/outside pitches by the same guys repeatedly! The coaches should have the ability to correct that, and the players should pull their head out of their orifices!


 Houston did do a bit better when they really needed to. The analytics has Boone pulling guys too early. How do they navigate an order later in the game if they seldom get the chance? Yes the analytics discover the problem, but the pitchers should be working longer during the season, especially considering how many runs the hitters put up...





One of the major problems in this era is that the stats are driving the response and not common sense.  The analytics are worthless sometimes.  You do not need analytics to see Ottovino stunk, Sanchez was clueless, EE next to clueless, Paxton pulled too early in his first start, some others pulled to soon.  The eye test and commons sense has to apply.  As to pitchers working longer, I agree, but the analytics guys always blather about how numbers go down the third time through the lineup, so teams pull pitchers when it occurs whether they are doing well or not.  Of course common sense will tell you that all pitchers do worse as the game progresses generally, but the solution to that is not to pull them before they run out of gas\while they are still effective but to pull them when they start to become ineffective\get as much out of them as possible.  Again, cart before the horse.  The stats say he will go bad, so let's pull him...does not always work that way and how hard is it to have someone warming up and go batter to batter?  But in this era, the stats are driving the strategy and in the case of the pitching, it has led to the "quest for the inefffective reliever" strategy as I like to call it.  Let's run out some guy from the bullpen who is neither good enough to start nor good enough to close or even setup instead.




The analytics are good at uncovering things about the game that have been overlooked. Things that should affect player usage, or providing information that those players could use to improve. I like the idea of batter to batter the third time through. Just pulling a guy sucks. But what the hell do we know?





The game has been around for over 100 years.  I have watched many 1000s of games.  Stats are a tool.  Like any tool, if used properly are a benefit.  If misinterpreted or used ineffectively, they can be a curse.  Stats should never replace common sense or what the eyes see that are ovbious.  As the sayings goes:  "Figures lie and liars figure" or "Lies, damned lies, and statistics".






Yup. You still need a manager who sees what the stats won't.  I do think the analytics have uncovered some good things, but they are not the way to run your team. You still need a competent human brain running the show, with the input of the analytics.

2 months ago  ::  Oct 21, 2019 - 8:20AM #58
Lola
Posts: 24,811

Oct 20, 2019 -- 9:45PM, Rob wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 5:03PM, qwik3457 wrote:


Oct 18, 2019 -- 9:09PM, Rob wrote:


I'm curious.  How does a GM build a team that hits .294 with RISP during the regular season, (to lead the MLB) and almost as well in the ALDS and into the first game of the ALCS but under .200 in the ALCS?




Opposing elite pitching explains that. You'd be surprised if you ever saw the BAVG w/RISP of the 1996 and 1998 Yankees' championship teams. I know I was when I researched it about 10 years ago.




Of course the fact that you are generally facing only very good pitching in the post season is a major reason offense is often stifled compared to regular season numbers.  You don't get to beat up on the Baltimores of MLB in the post season.  My query to the original post was that the poster seemed to imply you need one kind of offense to win in the regular season and another to win in the post season.  Nope.  What you need is for players go at least approximate what they did in the regular season on into the post season.



Interestingly, Houston's BA with RISP was even lower than that of the Yanks.  The difference was that of the few hits they did get with RISP, several were 3 run HRs.




Well I guess you can say Astros got lucky... 


Boone’s philosophy was his hitters would not get a lot of hits off the elite pitchers... Yanks home run hitters would make it count with the big blow... unfortunately Astros out scored us by a couple runs. That’s what makes it hurt so much... 

2 months ago  ::  Oct 21, 2019 - 9:04AM #59
Tippy
Posts: 432

In game 2, Boone should never have pulled Greene and brought Ottavino in. The latter served up the tying run.


In Game 3, with runners on 1st and 2nd, Gardner should have bunted the runners over.


Happ was well rested and should have started game 6.

2 months ago  ::  Oct 21, 2019 - 9:05AM #60
GottaGoToMo
Posts: 77,712

Oct 21, 2019 -- 9:04AM, Tippy wrote:


In game 2, Boone should never have pulled Greene and brought Ottavino in. The latter served up the tying run.


In Game 3, with runners on 1st and 2nd, Gardner should have bunted the runners over.


Happ was well rested and should have started game 6.




Isn't hindsight great!

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