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So glad Steinbrenner is "commited to winning"
2 months ago  ::  Oct 21, 2019 - 9:09AM #61
Celerino Sanchez
Posts: 86

Oct 21, 2019 -- 9:05AM, GottaGoToMo wrote:


Oct 21, 2019 -- 9:04AM, Tippy wrote:


In game 2, Boone should never have pulled Greene and brought Ottavino in. The latter served up the tying run.


In Game 3, with runners on 1st and 2nd, Gardner should have bunted the runners over.


Happ was well rested and should have started game 6.




Isn't hindsight great!




If all it took was hindsight to win a championship , Tippy would be the greatest manager in the history of baseball Laughing.


Actually he would be the greatest baseball mind who ever lived.

2 months ago  ::  Oct 21, 2019 - 10:09AM #62
cleanuphtr12
Posts: 1,241

Oct 20, 2019 -- 10:03PM, Secretagent wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 9:45PM, Rob wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 5:03PM, qwik3457 wrote:


Oct 18, 2019 -- 9:09PM, Rob wrote:


I'm curious.  How does a GM build a team that hits .294 with RISP during the regular season, (to lead the MLB) and almost as well in the ALDS and into the first game of the ALCS but under .200 in the ALCS?




Opposing elite pitching explains that. You'd be surprised if you ever saw the BAVG w/RISP of the 1996 and 1998 Yankees' championship teams. I know I was when I researched it about 10 years ago.




Of course the fact that you are generally facing only very good pitching in the post season is a major reason offense is often stifled compared to regular season numbers.  You don't get to beat up on the Baltimores of MLB in the post season.  My query to the original post was that the poster seemed to imply you need one kind of offense to win in the regular season and another to win in the post season.  Nope.  What you need is for players go at least approximate what they did in the regular season on into the post season.



Interestingly, Houston's BA with RISP was even lower than that of the Yanks.  The difference was that of the few hits they did get with RISP, several were 3 run HRs.





Actually, what you need is players on offense who have fundamentally sound approaches to hitting and understand situational hitting.  Players like that will succeed because they approach the game properly.  Guys like DJL and Torres and Hicks are fundamentally sound.  DJL is a contact, put the ball in play guy.  Torres changes his approach to the situation and count.  Hicks is a very disciplined hitter at the plate often taking a lot of pitches and drawing walks.  Compare that to Sanchez, EE, Didi, etc.   Sanchez is the opposite, fundamentally flawed, high-k guess hitter.  Easily defeated if you make the right pitch and post-season pitchers tend to do that.   EE is always trying to hit a Hr and has a lot of holes he can be beat at (esp now that he is getting older).  Didi never saw a pitch he would not swing at.  Yeah the latter types can beat up on the Os and Jays staffs and the Twins staff for that matter, but against top flight pitching, they will likely be shut down.  This has been an issue with the Yanks lineup for years.  Remember Swisher lol.  Or Sheffield. 


As to Houston's RISP, comes down to bad pitching\bad executrion of the pitching.  You hang sliders in the middle of the plate and good hitters will make you pay.  Luck that they are 2 or 3 run homers has really nothing to do with it.  The pitcher screwed up and paid for it.  You run out 5-6-7 pitchers on any given night and the probabilty is one or more of them will not be sharp and make mistakes\hang breaking pitches, etc.  Have a top starter that goes 7+ and you only need 1 or 2 relievers to close it out.  2 or 3 points of failure vs 5+.  Add in the obvious fact  that the guys in the BP are in the BP for a reason (esp the ones at the back end). 





Funny...  during the first few games of the Twins series all I heard was about how great EE's approach was and how he was a professional hitter.  Then he goes cold in the ALCS and suddenly his approach is terrible.  And Hicks has a nice ALCS where he walks a bunch and gets a few clutch hits and he's got the "right approach"?  I seriously doubt you were saying that five minutes ago when he was trying to argue his way onto the ALCS roster.



Forgive me, but it really seems like you're just making blanket statements about player's approaches based on a 6 game series.  Anyone who thinks EE has a bad plate approach really doesn't know what they're looking at.  He had a bad series.  


_______________________________________________

Please note:  I'm arguing against your post, not against you as a person.  I respect your right to have a different opinion even if I completely disagree with every word you wrote.
2 months ago  ::  Oct 21, 2019 - 10:38AM #63
Secretagent
Posts: 48

Oct 21, 2019 -- 10:09AM, cleanuphtr12 wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 10:03PM, Secretagent wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 9:45PM, Rob wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 5:03PM, qwik3457 wrote:


Oct 18, 2019 -- 9:09PM, Rob wrote:


I'm curious.  How does a GM build a team that hits .294 with RISP during the regular season, (to lead the MLB) and almost as well in the ALDS and into the first game of the ALCS but under .200 in the ALCS?




Opposing elite pitching explains that. You'd be surprised if you ever saw the BAVG w/RISP of the 1996 and 1998 Yankees' championship teams. I know I was when I researched it about 10 years ago.




Of course the fact that you are generally facing only very good pitching in the post season is a major reason offense is often stifled compared to regular season numbers.  You don't get to beat up on the Baltimores of MLB in the post season.  My query to the original post was that the poster seemed to imply you need one kind of offense to win in the regular season and another to win in the post season.  Nope.  What you need is for players go at least approximate what they did in the regular season on into the post season.



Interestingly, Houston's BA with RISP was even lower than that of the Yanks.  The difference was that of the few hits they did get with RISP, several were 3 run HRs.





Actually, what you need is players on offense who have fundamentally sound approaches to hitting and understand situational hitting.  Players like that will succeed because they approach the game properly.  Guys like DJL and Torres and Hicks are fundamentally sound.  DJL is a contact, put the ball in play guy.  Torres changes his approach to the situation and count.  Hicks is a very disciplined hitter at the plate often taking a lot of pitches and drawing walks.  Compare that to Sanchez, EE, Didi, etc.   Sanchez is the opposite, fundamentally flawed, high-k guess hitter.  Easily defeated if you make the right pitch and post-season pitchers tend to do that.   EE is always trying to hit a Hr and has a lot of holes he can be beat at (esp now that he is getting older).  Didi never saw a pitch he would not swing at.  Yeah the latter types can beat up on the Os and Jays staffs and the Twins staff for that matter, but against top flight pitching, they will likely be shut down.  This has been an issue with the Yanks lineup for years.  Remember Swisher lol.  Or Sheffield. 


As to Houston's RISP, comes down to bad pitching\bad executrion of the pitching.  You hang sliders in the middle of the plate and good hitters will make you pay.  Luck that they are 2 or 3 run homers has really nothing to do with it.  The pitcher screwed up and paid for it.  You run out 5-6-7 pitchers on any given night and the probabilty is one or more of them will not be sharp and make mistakes\hang breaking pitches, etc.  Have a top starter that goes 7+ and you only need 1 or 2 relievers to close it out.  2 or 3 points of failure vs 5+.  Add in the obvious fact  that the guys in the BP are in the BP for a reason (esp the ones at the back end). 





Funny...  during the first few games of the Twins series all I heard was about how great EE's approach was and how he was a professional hitter.  Then he goes cold in the ALCS and suddenly his approach is terrible.  And Hicks has a nice ALCS where he walks a bunch and gets a few clutch hits and he's got the "right approach"?  I seriously doubt you were saying that five minutes ago when he was trying to argue his way onto the ALCS roster.



Forgive me, but it really seems like you're just making blanket statements about player's approaches based on a 6 game series.  Anyone who thinks EE has a bad plate approach really doesn't know what they're looking at.  He had a bad series.  






Anyone who watches the Yanks knows Hicks is a very patient hitter who takes his walks.  Anyone who has watched EE over the past few years knows his avg has fallen quite a bit and he has trouble with breaking pitches.  There is a reason he hits 230-240 now.  if you are seriously comparing the likes of Kyle Gibson, Odorizzi, and Berrios with Cole, Verlander and Greinke, then you obviously have no idea about what you are talking about.  All you have to do is watch games to know Sanchez is a free swinging, guess hitting hack.  The Yanks have been cursed by the idiotic homer or nothing approach by high k guess hitters over the past 10-15 years from Swisher to Sheffield to Sanchez to Granderson to Stanton to a dozen other player I could name.  There is a reason none of these guys can hit squat against elite pitching, namely mistake and guess hitters tend not to get a lot of mistakes from Verlander types and they do not get to go against the Ynoa's or Yacabonis's of the league in the post season.

2 months ago  ::  Oct 22, 2019 - 8:05AM #64
nc01
Posts: 2,260

Oct 21, 2019 -- 9:04AM, Tippy wrote:


In game 2, Boone should never have pulled Greene and brought Ottavino in. The latter served up the tying run.


In Game 3, with runners on 1st and 2nd, Gardner should have bunted the runners over.


Happ was well rested and should have started game 6.




What an idiot.



NC...


2 months ago  ::  Oct 23, 2019 - 1:19PM #65
Jon
Posts: 711

Oct 21, 2019 -- 10:38AM, Secretagent wrote:


Oct 21, 2019 -- 10:09AM, cleanuphtr12 wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 10:03PM, Secretagent wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 9:45PM, Rob wrote:


Oct 20, 2019 -- 5:03PM, qwik3457 wrote:


Oct 18, 2019 -- 9:09PM, Rob wrote:


I'm curious.  How does a GM build a team that hits .294 with RISP during the regular season, (to lead the MLB) and almost as well in the ALDS and into the first game of the ALCS but under .200 in the ALCS?




Opposing elite pitching explains that. You'd be surprised if you ever saw the BAVG w/RISP of the 1996 and 1998 Yankees' championship teams. I know I was when I researched it about 10 years ago.




Of course the fact that you are generally facing only very good pitching in the post season is a major reason offense is often stifled compared to regular season numbers.  You don't get to beat up on the Baltimores of MLB in the post season.  My query to the original post was that the poster seemed to imply you need one kind of offense to win in the regular season and another to win in the post season.  Nope.  What you need is for players go at least approximate what they did in the regular season on into the post season.



Interestingly, Houston's BA with RISP was even lower than that of the Yanks.  The difference was that of the few hits they did get with RISP, several were 3 run HRs.





Actually, what you need is players on offense who have fundamentally sound approaches to hitting and understand situational hitting.  Players like that will succeed because they approach the game properly.  Guys like DJL and Torres and Hicks are fundamentally sound.  DJL is a contact, put the ball in play guy.  Torres changes his approach to the situation and count.  Hicks is a very disciplined hitter at the plate often taking a lot of pitches and drawing walks.  Compare that to Sanchez, EE, Didi, etc.   Sanchez is the opposite, fundamentally flawed, high-k guess hitter.  Easily defeated if you make the right pitch and post-season pitchers tend to do that.   EE is always trying to hit a Hr and has a lot of holes he can be beat at (esp now that he is getting older).  Didi never saw a pitch he would not swing at.  Yeah the latter types can beat up on the Os and Jays staffs and the Twins staff for that matter, but against top flight pitching, they will likely be shut down.  This has been an issue with the Yanks lineup for years.  Remember Swisher lol.  Or Sheffield. 


As to Houston's RISP, comes down to bad pitching\bad executrion of the pitching.  You hang sliders in the middle of the plate and good hitters will make you pay.  Luck that they are 2 or 3 run homers has really nothing to do with it.  The pitcher screwed up and paid for it.  You run out 5-6-7 pitchers on any given night and the probabilty is one or more of them will not be sharp and make mistakes\hang breaking pitches, etc.  Have a top starter that goes 7+ and you only need 1 or 2 relievers to close it out.  2 or 3 points of failure vs 5+.  Add in the obvious fact  that the guys in the BP are in the BP for a reason (esp the ones at the back end). 





Funny...  during the first few games of the Twins series all I heard was about how great EE's approach was and how he was a professional hitter.  Then he goes cold in the ALCS and suddenly his approach is terrible.  And Hicks has a nice ALCS where he walks a bunch and gets a few clutch hits and he's got the "right approach"?  I seriously doubt you were saying that five minutes ago when he was trying to argue his way onto the ALCS roster.



Forgive me, but it really seems like you're just making blanket statements about player's approaches based on a 6 game series.  Anyone who thinks EE has a bad plate approach really doesn't know what they're looking at.  He had a bad series.  






Anyone who watches the Yanks knows Hicks is a very patient hitter who takes his walks. 




Hicks OBP this year was .325, career .328 OBP. He had ONE year walking 90 times (against 111 K's).

1 month ago  ::  Oct 26, 2019 - 5:11PM #66
qwik3457
Posts: 11,935

Oct 23, 2019 -- 1:19PM, Jon wrote:


Oct 21, 2019 -- 10:38AM, Secretagent wrote:


Anyone who watches the Yanks knows Hicks is a very patient hitter who takes his walks. 




Hicks OBP this year was .325, career .328 OBP. He had ONE year walking 90 times (against 111 K's).




...and his career OBA is low because his career BAVG is low, not because he doesn't draw walks. His lifetime BAVG is .236, and in consideration of that, an OBA of .328 is quite good, actually. In fact, any hitter whose OBA is nearly 100 points about his BAVG is almost certainly a very patient hitter drawing good percentage of walks (unless he's getting hit by pitches 20-30 times a season).


Looking specifically at Hicks' walk rate this season, it was the lowest it's been since his partial season with the team in 2016, and was still 4th on the team among hitters who saw significant playing time with the team. Last season he was first on the team, even ahead of Judge. In 2017, he was 2nd behind Judge. His walk rate this season was 12.2%, and if he had enough AB to be a BAVG qualifier, he'd have been 8th in the AL in walk rate. Last year, he was a BAVG qualifier and his BB rate of 15.5% was 2nd in the AL behind only Mike Trout. His 14.1% walk rate in 2017 would've been 6th in the AL if he'd had enough PA.


Looking at pitches seen per PA, In 2017, it was 4.11, well above the league average of 3.91 and it would've been good enough for 12th in the league if he'd had enough PA to qualify. In 2018, it was 4.28, well above the league average of 3.90 and good for 6th in the league. In 2019, in was 4.20, well above the league average of 3.95, and would've been good enough for 12th in the AL if he'd had enough plate appearances. In the last 3 seasons, there are 234 MLB hitters with 1000 or more PA. Hicks' walk rate is 14.4% and he's ranks 12th among the 234.


Fangraphs  compiles a stat called O-Swing%, which is simply the percentage of pitches outside the strike zone that a hitter chases. Hicks chases 22.3% of those pitches, and that sounds like a lot, but it isn't. He ranks 13th lowest among the 234 in that category. He does swing and miss a lot, overall. His Contact% is 75.1%, which is 68th highest among the 234. However, Sanchez, Stanton and Judge all rank higher (or lower depending how you look at it). 


He's had one year walking 90 times because he goes on the IL a lot, and doesn't come close to playing full seasons most years. But in the last three seasons with the Yankees, his BB rate per 162 games played is 99. If you reduce that to a "normal full season" of 150 and it's 92 BB per 150 games played.


========================================


You can say different things about Hicks as a hitter. One thing you can say is that he has enormous difficulty hitting changeups, splitters and slow curves, unless the pitcher leaves one up in the zone, and even then, change of speeds usually causes him to mis-time them and foul them off. You can say he strikes out too much. You can say his popup rate is too high. You can say that the last two things cause his BAVG to be too low for a hitter of his apparent physical abilities.


But one thing that you can't truthfully say is that he's not a patient hitter and he doesn't walk enough. 

Knowledge is Good -- Emil Faber
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