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11 months ago  ::  Nov 30, 2019 - 10:00AM #341
NY23
Posts: 10,177

MLB rumors: Imagining Yankees add Pirates’ Starling Marte in 3-team trade that involves Miguel Andujar, J.A. Happ - nj.com


The Pittsburgh Pirates are shopping star center fielder Startling Marte, and the rumor mill has the Mets interested in working out a trade.


This would be a good fit because the Mets have been looking for a true center fielder and Marte, a two-time Gold Glove winner who was an All-Star in 2016, fits the mold.


Another club that could use Marte is the Yankees.


Yankees starting center fielder Aaron Hicks, who is early into his recovery from Tommy John surgery, might not play until July, and Marte would be about as good a fill-in as anyone … even better than bringing back free agent Brett Gardner.


When Hicks returns, Marte could move to left field, which would either move Mike Tauchman from a starting role to backup or slide Giancarlo Stanton from left field to full-time designated hitter.


What would it cost the Yankees to pry Marte from the rebuilding-again Pirates?


Our fantasy trade is a three-team deal that would send talented-but-expendable third baseman Miguel Andujar to the Pirates and left-handed starter J.A. Happ to the Atlanta Braves.


In addition to receiving Marte, the Yankees would get left-hander Sean Newcomb from the Braves, and Atlanta would send third baseman Colin Moran and catching prospect William Contreras to Pittsburgh.


While parting with Andujar, the 2018 AL Rookie of the Year runner-up, would hurt the Yankees’ depth, there are a lot of factors that would make this trade attractive for them.


1. The Yankees dealing for Marte probably would prevent Gardner from returning, and while this tradeoff would cost them a clubhouse leader who had a standout 2019, for basically the same money they’d be getting a better all-around player who is five years younger. Gardner, 36, probably will end up with a one-year deal for about $11.5 million, while Marte, 31, will make $11.5 million next season and has a $12.5 million club option or $1 million buyout for 2021.


2. Gardner had his best season last year batting .251 with 28 homers, 74 RBI, 10 steals and an .829 OPS in 141 games, but expecting big numbers again in 2020 might be asking too much for an aging player who looked about done during his down 2018 campaign. Meantime, Marte batted .295 with 23 homers, 82 RBI, 25 steals and an .845 OPS in 132 games last season and he might be better being part of a much deeper Yankees lineup.


3. The Yankees are committed to playing Gio Urshela at third base next season, and even before his breakout 2019, the club was down on Andujar’s defense so much that it tried trading him last winter.


5. Dumping Happ’s contract might be a must for Yankees GM Brian Cashman to get the go-ahead from ownership to add a No. 1 starter by signing Gerrit Cole or Stephen Strasburg. Happ is due $17 million next year (plus possibly another $17 million in 2021 via vesting option), so that money off the books could lower the Yankees’ luxury tax payment next year with either Cole or Strasburg on the books for $35 million or so annually.


6. The Yankees would like to add a left-hander to their bullpen, and they could get that and more in Newcomb, who was a standout starter for Atlanta as a second-year player in 2018 and a good reliever last season. Depending on how the Yankees’ winter goes, Newcomb, 26, could be used as a starter and/or reliever in 2020.


7. Newcomb just missed being eligible for salary arbitration as a Super 2, so he’ll probably have a salary below $1 million in 2020.


As for the Pirates’ return, they’d be getting a very good young hitter in Andujar plus potentially a starting catcher by 2021 in Contreras, the younger brother of Cubs No. 1 catcher Willson Contreras.


The Pirates are weak at catcher at the major league level and none of their top 30 prospects is a catcher, according to MLB Pipeline. Also, the Braves are deep at catching in the majors and two of their top prospects are catchers, Shea Langelies (No. 5) and Contreras (No. 8).


As for the two-time reigning NL East champion Braves, they’d get a productive third baseman in Moran to replace free agent Josh Donaldson and fill a rotation opening with Happ, a 2018 All-Star who is coming off a down season but could cut down on his homers allowed pitching for Atlanta, which has a bigger home ballpark.


To sum up, this three-team fantasy trade seems fair for everyone, and most importantly, could benefit all three clubs in 2020 and beyond.

11 months ago  ::  Nov 30, 2019 - 10:02AM #342
NY23
Posts: 10,177

LEFTY ALEX WOOD COULD FIND A HOME IN THE BRONX!


There's a nice little nugget out there as far as getting some lefty pitching is concerned. It features Alex Wood and the New York Yankees. And so, we were curious to read about it.  Here's the story from The Runner Sports:


"Hitting the free agent market is a 28-year-old left hander from North Carolina: His Name? Alex Wood. Being a starting pitcher AND relief pitcher, he’s a very unique type of talent in this free agent class... 


Wood is a rarity nowadays, rarely do you see a pitcher be used as a reliever and a long-inning starter. He is effective out of the bullpen and effective as a starter too, posting great career ERA numbers in both roles: As a Starter: 3.40 ERA As a Reliever: 2.70 ERA With his above-average ERA as a starter, he’d be able to be relied upon as a starter in the Bronx. 

He’d fit in nicely behind Luis SeverinoJames Paxton, and any big name the Yankees potentially want to put in the starting rotation. However, his ability to be a very viable option out of the bullpen in long relief adds a myriad of pitching combinations. "

I love this idea by Ryan Garcia at Runner Sports! Anyway. I just wanted to share this with you. I think it makes a lot of sense.

Let's GO!
10 months ago  ::  Dec 01, 2019 - 9:39AM #343
NY23
Posts: 10,177

CBS Sports | Dayn Perry: As we get deeper and deeper into the offseason, rumors have obviously circulated about free agent signings and/or potential trades. Just recently, rumors came out that the Phillies might be interested in a few Yankees’ free agents. After hiring former Yankees’ manager Joe Girardi, it might make sense for the Phillies to go after a Yankee. It is rumored that they might be interested former Yankees shortstop Didi Gregorius, reliever Dellin Betances and backup catcher Austin Romine.


SNY | Garrett Stepien: It was rumored by The Athletic's Ken Rosenthal that the Yankees might be a suitor for A’s reliever Blake Treinen. As most already know, the Yankees have one of the most lethal bullpens in baseball. Treinen was one of the best relievers in MLB in 2018, but struggled in 2019. If the Yankees were to make a move for Treinen and could find a way to get him pitching like he did in 2018, it would only make that their bullpen that much more scary.


NJ.com | Randy Miller: Another rumor has started circling that the Pirates are looking to shop their center fielder Starling Marte. With Aaron Hicks out for at least half the season, this could definitely be an interesting option for the Yankees. Marte had a great year in 2019, batting .295 with 23 home runs and 82 RBI and could fill in nicely until Hicks comes back. Even when Hicks returns, Marte could still play, pushing Giancarlo Stanton to the DH position. Marte would certainly let the Yankees maintain their incredible starpower in the outfield.


MLB rumors: Yankees’ Clint Frazier on block? Here are 4 trades that make sense - nj.com

10 months ago  ::  Dec 01, 2019 - 9:41AM #344
NY23
Posts: 10,177

How Chance Adams can still help the Yankees


Adams rose to the top of the system in 2017 and stagnated, but he still has a Chance.


Chance Adams has been a difficult prospect to predict. Adams didn’t rank highly on many prospect lists until he tore through two levels of the minors in 2017. His raw statlines were excellent, but a lack of development time and concern about how many of his pitches were MLB-ready delayed a call-up until the following season. An unimpressive stint in the majors alongside a rising ERA in Triple-A Scranton prevented him from sticking to the majors, and more of the same occurred in 2019.


The overwhelming majority of his career appearances have been as a starting pitcher, but with a lack of spots on the big-league roster and a downward trend in his development, perhaps it’s time to consider a long-term change. A move to the bullpen could bring the best out of Adams, and provide the best solution for the Yankees if they want to get the most out of their former top pitching prospect.


Adams’ arsenal consists of his primary four-seam fastball, and then a mix of offspeed choices that don’t stand out much from each other: a slider, change, and curveball. It was crucial to Adams’ development that he continue to work on all of these pitches, since an MLB starter with only one or two options won’t often succeed. However, cutting down on those options could help him improve and wouldn’t impede his progress as a reliever.


Focusing specifically on his fastball, Adams hovers around 92 mph. Paired with a set of relievers like Aroldis ChapmanZack Britton, and Chad Green who come out of the ‘pen throwing heat in the upper 90’s, Adams could fit comfortably into a middle relief role that changes the timing of opposing batters. Several of the Yankee starters, like Luis Severino and James Paxton, also rely on high velocity setting up their pitches, so bringing a contrast to that cavalcade of hard-throwing pitchers could be especially beneficial.


Then comes the question of which secondary offering Adams could best pair with his fastball in an effort to become more of a two-pitch reliever. Adams has tended to use his slider and curveball roughly the same amount in his outings, somewhere around 20 percent each, while his changeup is more of a show pitch that appears less than 10 percent of the time.


Cutting the changeup seems like the best decision, since it isn’t a pitch he’s shown much confidence in. Adams can then use his slider as a secondary set-up, and either throw the occasional curveball to keep hitters honest or transition entirely to a two-pitch arsenal. It may be best to keep the curve in his repertoire, since a finesse pitcher like himself needs some movement to set up his pitches, and with the changeup out he could use the curve solely to get chasing swings in the bottom of the strike zone.


Adams has one more year before he’s up for arbitration, and he could be a non-tender option if he doesn’t make an impact soon. Considering the other pitchers ahead of him in the system like Deivi GarciaMichael King, and Jordan Montgomery, and the lack of opportunities for starters remaining, a move to the bullpen may be Adams’ best chance to latch on in the majors in any significant capacity.

10 months ago  ::  Dec 01, 2019 - 9:45AM #345
NY23
Posts: 10,177

The Yankees’ trade for James Paxton, one year out


How does New York’s trade for the big left-hander look one year later?


Just over one year ago, the Yankees acquired James Paxton from the Seattle Mariners. The move was something of an opening salvo for the team’s offseason. While it didn’t precede any earth-shattering signings like we may have expected, Paxton’s acquisition was the first of many throughout the winter that reshaped the Yankees’ roster heading into 2019.


At the time, Paxton seemed like a perfect trade target for the Bombers. Just four days before the trade went down, I highlighted Paxton as the team’s primary objective on the trade market. Once the move was consummated, we described it as a great pickup, and fans appeared to approve of the trade universally.


Of course, it’s become cliche to point out that teams don’t win or lose trades on the day they’re made. The way we view a deal shifts constantly, sometimes veering wildly in one direction or the other. Part of the fun of reviewing swaps is checking in on them at times down the road to see how each side has fared.


While Paxton yet again did not reach his potential in 2019, the Yankees still seem to have the clear upper hand on the Mariners in terms of this deal. One year out, the Yankees don’t look to have given up any players they will miss, in what feels like another case of a team knowing which prospects to trade.


To secure Paxton’s services for 2019 and 2020, the Yankees surrendered a pair of interesting pitching prospects: left-hander Justus Sheffield, and right-hander Erik Swanson. Sheffield was the jewel, and one of New York’s best prospects at the time of the trade. It was also the second time Sheffield was traded, as the young lefty had originally landed in the Bronx from Cleveland thanks to the Andrew Miller trade.


Entering 2019, Sheffield retained pretty much all of his prospect sheen. Consensus among public-facing scouts put him among the top-50 prospects in the world, with Baseball America ranking him highest at 27th. Sheffield boasted a long track record of success in the minors and quality stuff. He managed a sparkling 2.56 ERA in 116 innings across the Yankees’ high minors affiliates in 2018, and showed off his mid-90’s fastball and plus slider in the process.


Yet questions lingered regarding Sheffield’s durability and ultimate role in the majors, thanks in part to his relatively small and stocky frame. At 6-foot-0 and 200 pounds, some scouts reasoned Sheffield didn’t have the build of a long-term starter, and that reliever outcomes mostly made up his future. Sheffield also never found a third plus pitch, leaving him short of an arsenal that could turn over elite lineups multiple times. These questions likely shaped the Yankees’ willingness to deal Sheffield weeks after he had made his major-league debut in pinstripes.


Those concerns mostly came home to roost in 2019. Sheffield’s command regressed, as he walked over four batters per nine in 133 innings across multiple levels. One of those levels was Double-A, as Sheffield struggled so mightily with his original Triple-A assignment (a 6.87 ERA in 55 innings) that he was demoted in May. He eventually found his way to the bigs, where he struck out 37 batters in 36 innings, but also issued 18 walks and yielded 22 runs.


Sheffield now ranks ninth on the Mariners’ top-30 prospect list per MLB Pipeline, after entering the year in first. Baseball Prospectus also dropped him from first to ninth on their Mariners list. The frontline starter potential that Sheffield once displayed has seemingly evaporated, leaving a host of back-end starter and solid reliever projections instead.


Meanwhile, Swanson also fell off after leaving the Yankees’ organization. After seeing his stock explode after a tremendous 2018, when he struck out 139 batters in 121.2 minor-league innings with a 2.66 ERA, Swanson scuffled upon reaching the majors. The Mariners gave Swanson a fair bit of run, working him both as a starter and a reliever for 58 innings at the highest level. Swanson was battered for 41 runs, though his 52-to-12 strikeout-to-walk ratio was at least respectable.


The Mariners’ reasoning for the Paxton trade rested on the possibility that one of Sheffield or Swanson, or both, could some day perform at a level close to Paxton’s peak, but on a more optimal timeline for the team’s supposed window of contention. One year later, neither profiles as likely to even be an above average major leaguer any time soon, though the jury certainly is still out on both prospects.


I don’t need to recount in full Paxton’s up-and-down, ultimately valuable debut season with the Yankees. Paxton flashed elite upside while dealing with a few slumps and injuries, which sounds about par for the course for his career. Even so, as the Yankees continue to compete for a championship, that type of quality production, with the potential for more, easily outstrips whatever loss the team incurred in dealing a pair of prospects.


Indeed, the main lesson the Yankees could take from the Paxton trade thus far is one we discussed earlier this week through the lens of Greg Bird’s release; not all prospects pan out. Aggressively moving any prospect that doesn’t fall among the game’s truly elite for actual big-league talent is often a slam dunk for a contending team. Sheffield's and Swanson’s regression should remind the Yankees of that fact.


All told, I think Brian Cashman and the Yankees would bring in Paxton 100 times out of 100 given how the deal has unfolded over the past year. Paxton still brings a likely floor of a quality starter, and the ceiling of an ace. It’s not easy to find that kind of high-end talent, and the Yankees found some in exchange for prospects they won’t miss.

10 months ago  ::  Dec 01, 2019 - 9:47AM #346
NY23
Posts: 10,177

The Coming Infield Conundrum


In baseball, there is hardly ever too much of a good thing. Too many homers? No such thing. Too much starting pitching? No such thing. Too many good players? No such thing. But that last one can make roster situations a bit complicated and the Yankees are about to run into that.


Even if they let Didi Gregorius leave in free agency–which both Randy and I think would be a mistake–the infield in the Bronx will be crowded. Both Gio Urshela and the returning Miguel Andujar can man third base. Greg Bird’s departure still leaves two first base options in Luke Voit and Mike Ford. Both Gleyber Torres and DJ LeMahieu are givens here; their spots are not in any sort of question. But a question does remain with the others: what exactly should the Yankees do with them?


There is a possibility that the Yankees keep all six on the 25 man roster. That would mean, however, that the two non-starting players would take up most of the bench, especially since the Yankees like running with a three man bench. That preference makes this scenario unlikely because, aside from the backup catcher, they’d need room for a fourth outfielder. None of those players belong anywhere near the outfield.


The other fly in the infield ointment is that of the players they currently have–not including the heretofore unmentioned Tyler Wade–only Gleyber Torres can play shortstop. No team is going to carry just one reliable shortstop. Whether it’s Didi, Wade, or someone else, the Yankees will need to have someone else able to play short; that will push someone off the 25 man roster.


Alleviating this ‘pressure’ by having everyone around probably isn’t going to happen. So what can they do?


They can delay. Miguel Andujar could start the year in the minors on a rehab assignment. That takes care of one. To further kick the can down the road, Mike Ford has two options left, according to Roster Resource at Fan Graphs. Gio Urshela doesn’t have options left, so that defaults him to be the starting third baseman.


There’s also the instinct to make a trade, but I don’t think there’s going to be much value there. While Urshela’s value has never been higher, I don’t think there’d be a market for him, given how fluky last year was for him and there’s no way we’ll know if he can repeat it until he does. Mike Ford is what he is–a late 20’s, LHB first baseman with power–not exactly rare or extremely valuable. Luke Voit is likely more valuable to the Yankees as their starting first baseman than he is as a trade chip.


Andujar has the most trade value of the bunch by far. He’s the youngest, probably has the biggest upside, and with his value slightly depressed from his injury and missed year, I’m sure some team would want to get a bargain for him. But he’s far too much of a variable at this point when you add in his poor defense at third. While it might be a challenge to incorporate him later, he, like Voit, is probably most valuable to the Yankees as a player than as a chip.


Depth helped the Yankees win over 100 games in 2019 and it will help them do the same in 2020. While there’s going to be some juggling involved, it’s necessary juggling.

10 months ago  ::  Dec 01, 2019 - 10:17AM #347
SSBob643
Posts: 3,017

Dec 1, 2019 -- 9:47AM, NY23 wrote:


The Coming Infield Conundrum


In baseball, there is hardly ever too much of a good thing. Too many homers? No such thing. Too much starting pitching? No such thing. Too many good players? No such thing. But that last one can make roster situations a bit complicated and the Yankees are about to run into that.


Even if they let Didi Gregorius leave in free agency–which both Randy and I think would be a mistake–the infield in the Bronx will be crowded. Both Gio Urshela and the returning Miguel Andujar can man third base. Greg Bird’s departure still leaves two first base options in Luke Voit and Mike Ford. Both Gleyber Torres and DJ LeMahieu are givens here; their spots are not in any sort of question. But a question does remain with the others: what exactly should the Yankees do with them?


There is a possibility that the Yankees keep all six on the 25 man roster. That would mean, however, that the two non-starting players would take up most of the bench, especially since the Yankees like running with a three man bench. That preference makes this scenario unlikely because, aside from the backup catcher, they’d need room for a fourth outfielder. None of those players belong anywhere near the outfield.


The other fly in the infield ointment is that of the players they currently have–not including the heretofore unmentioned Tyler Wade–only Gleyber Torres can play shortstop. No team is going to carry just one reliable shortstop. Whether it’s Didi, Wade, or someone else, the Yankees will need to have someone else able to play short; that will push someone off the 25 man roster.


Alleviating this ‘pressure’ by having everyone around probably isn’t going to happen. So what can they do?


They can delay. Miguel Andujar could start the year in the minors on a rehab assignment. That takes care of one. To further kick the can down the road, Mike Ford has two options left, according to Roster Resource at Fan Graphs. Gio Urshela doesn’t have options left, so that defaults him to be the starting third baseman.


There’s also the instinct to make a trade, but I don’t think there’s going to be much value there. While Urshela’s value has never been higher, I don’t think there’d be a market for him, given how fluky last year was for him and there’s no way we’ll know if he can repeat it until he does. Mike Ford is what he is–a late 20’s, LHB first baseman with power–not exactly rare or extremely valuable. Luke Voit is likely more valuable to the Yankees as their starting first baseman than he is as a trade chip.


Andujar has the most trade value of the bunch by far. He’s the youngest, probably has the biggest upside, and with his value slightly depressed from his injury and missed year, I’m sure some team would want to get a bargain for him. But he’s far too much of a variable at this point when you add in his poor defense at third. While it might be a challenge to incorporate him later, he, like Voit, is probably most valuable to the Yankees as a player than as a chip.


Depth helped the Yankees win over 100 games in 2019 and it will help them do the same in 2020. While there’s going to be some juggling involved, it’s necessary juggling.




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


"There is a possibility that the Yankees keep all six on the 25 man roster."


Roster expands to 26 in 2020.


"None of those players belong anywhere near the outfield."


Agree 100%. Talk of moving Andujar to LF...I don't see it.

10 months ago  ::  Dec 01, 2019 - 7:08PM #348
NY23
Posts: 10,177

What can Michael King bring to the Yankees’ rotation?



With open slots in the rotation and at least one starter an injury risk, we may get a look at the longtime prospect early in 2020.



While the Yankees are first focused on relief pitching - Tim Hill and Blake Treinen, come on down - the team still needs their rotation gaps filled. Luis SeverinoJames PaxtonMasahiro Tanaka and Jordan Montgomery will fill the first four slots, but there’s real discussion about whether J.A. Happ should be the fifth starter, relegated to the bullpen, or should simply be part of a payroll-cutting move. Even if Happ is in the rotation, you can never have too much pitching depth, and the Yankees will inevitably need extra arms ready to go once a starter hits the injured list.


Enter Michael King. The righty will be in his age-25 season in 2020, and after progressing through an injury of his own, King made his major-league debut in late September. King could have a major role to play in the team’s rotation with a strong spring training and bad injury luck on the depth chart.


What will he look like? King’s game is all about command and contact - he’s run a groundball rate at about 45% at every level of the minors with both Miami and the Yankees, and balanced that with a huge jump in strikeout rate once settling in with Triple-A Scranton. If you figure that K-BB% is itself the single most important factor in a pitcher’s performance (I do) and that contact allowed needs to be on the ground, King’s Scranton numbers hold up pretty well against the whole of MLB:



Our red triangle here is King’s work in Triple-A. Obviously the quality of competition increases when you face a lineup of nine MLB hitters, but the building blocks of sustainable success are there for King. His two-seam fastball gets acclaim from all evaluators, and playing for a team that has made the two-seam/cut a staple of repertoires can only help him.


The key with King just might be how sustainable his jump in strikeout rate is. The 28.6% rate he posted with Scranton is his highest in any notable innings count at any stage of the minors, and he’s a good example of the information asymmetry that now pervades minor leaguers.


So much data is available to teams that it’s harder than ever to say whether a positive trend is the result of a marked change in approach or skill, or if it’s just small sample noise. TINSTAPP still holds, so for now I’m going to remain more conservative, but a good two-seamer with the ability to miss bats raises King’s floor considerably, and perhaps turns him into something more than the fifth-starter prototype that a lot of projection systems peg him for.


We might get an early look at King’s development too - he’ll certainly get ample opportunity to show off in spring training, and James Paxton will likely require an IL trip at some point in 2020. That’s probably King’s best chance to get real MLB experience; until proven otherwise he should be starting every fifth day, rather than shuffled into a relief role, so beginning the year in Scranton while waiting for a chance to slot into the rotation on a needs basis looks like the most likely outcome for 2020.


10 months ago  ::  Dec 02, 2019 - 10:40AM #349
NY23
Posts: 10,177

Yankees preparing to lose three free agent players to the Phillies


The Yankees have shown little interest this offseason in bringing back three free-agent players. Dellin Betances, who tore his Achilles late last season after working his way back from numerous ailments, Didi Gregorius, who’s qualifying offer was rejected by the Yankees and is thought to be too expensive, and backup catcher Austine Romine, all sit available in free agency.


The Philadelphia Phillies have been connected to all three, as stealing some of the Yankees’ mojo and locker-room atmosphere might do them some good. According to the NY Post, there has been continuous interest in the three Yankee players mentioned above, and they all may end up featuring on the same team once again.


The Yankees could fight their way into the mix for Betances:


On his contract year, Betances going down with a significant injury made earning a multi-year deal almost impossible. He will likely receive a one-year, “prove it” deal to ensure he can still pitch with quality. The righty arm was an All-Star from 2014-17, which should be taken into consideration. If he remained healthy last season, there’s no question Betances would be the top option on the market.


However, the Yankees would be foolish not to offer him a low-ball deal to try and retain his skill-set. Dellin would potentially forfeit playing for a World Series-caliber team in search of more money on a kicker contract anyway, so remaining with a familiar club might be in his best interest.


General manager Brian Cashman could offer him a one-year, $10 million deal to retain his services, which could come in handy next season if he returns to full health.


Gregorius, on the other hand, is the best shortstop free agent on the market, which drives his price-tag up significantly. The Yankees have Gleyber Torres, their future at the position, ready to take over if they feel comfortable with his defense. Unloading that type of money for a shortstop coming off Tommy John surgery and failed to hit over .250 last season is unadvisable.


Romine, who was a capable backup behind Gary Sanchez, is considered expendable. The Yankees like Kyle Higashioka, so we should expect him to be slotted in at the backup spot for the foreseeable future.


10 months ago  ::  Dec 02, 2019 - 10:41AM #350
NY23
Posts: 10,177

New York Post | Dan MartinGerrit Cole is in a dream scenario for MLB players. He’s the best pitcher in the league, and he’s hitting free agency after the best season of his career and one of the best stretches in MLB history. But would Cole be where he is today if he signed with the Yankees in 2008, when they drafted him in the first round of the MLB draft? Probably not. Former UCLA head coach John Savage talks about Cole’s ability to make the right decision time after time, and he suspects it will have a lot to do with his chances of winning and the team around him. That’s good news for the Yankees.

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