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2 months ago  ::  Dec 06, 2019 - 10:58AM #391
NY23
Posts: 4,019

Mailbag: Backup Catcher, Budget Situation, Lockout, Third Base Opener


Ray Asks: Several backup catchers hit the market and the Yanks should bring in someone to compete with Higgy for the backup job. Who do you like? I’m going Kevin Plawecki (pitch framing) with everyone else decidedly “yuch.”


This was good timing because I took a look at Higashioka yesterday. I actually think that Higashioka is going to be the man to get that job specifically because of his pitch framing, which is an elite skill he possesses. It’s also something that the Yankees consider the most valuable part of a catcher’s defensive repertoire. It only figures that it will play a big role in determining Sánchez’s backup. That Higashioka will only be making the league minimum only helps his case. The Yankees don’t like to devote a lot of money to the backup catcher slot. I don’t blame them.


Anyway, it is true that Kevin Plawecki had a great year behind the plate for Cleveland last year. According to Statcast, he converted 53.6% of 1,279 non-swing pitches into strikes, which is very, very good. It would rank at the top of the league, actually. It saved Cleveland four runs.


Here’s the thing though: Higashioka saved two runs in a third of the chances and converted a higher percentage of non-swings into strikes. He’s always been a positive framer at the MLB and MiLB level. Plawecki, on the other hand, has been more up-and-down. He was exceptional in 2015, okay in 2016, awful in 2017 and 2018, and better again in 2019. Perhaps Swanson is confident he could make that a consistent skill, but who knows?


Anyway, Plawecki can’t hit at all, logging a .218/.304/.332 (74 OPS+) line in about 1,000 career at-bats, but it is better than anything Higashioka has done. MLBTR predicts Plaweki gets $1.3 million (Romine is pegged for $2.0m) so it’s not like he’d be expensive. I just have a feeling that they stay in-house for this one if Romine doesn’t come back, but Plawecki wouldn’t shock me. It’s a good idea for sure, even if not the most exciting. But hey, we are talking about the backup catcher, after all.


Jonathan Asks: It looks like there will be a lockout. It stinks but that’s realistically what will happen. In that case, no one gets paid. In general, do you think teams will incentivize players (like Cole) by paying them significantly less in 2021 and more in 2022? For example, let’s say it’s seven years 245 ($35m a year). Pay him $55m in 2022 and $15 in 2021. It’s good for luxury tax purposes and also players (like Cole) get more money so it might incentivize them to come.


This is an interesting thought, but not a likely scenario. I do have to say that I agree that a work stoppage is likely, and, if a stoppage happens, it will be a lockout, not a strike. The current Collective Bargaining Agreement expires after the 2021 season. We’ve got two years yet to go.


Anyway, I don’t think we will see contracts structured in this way for a few reasons. First, and probably most importantly, the way that the current Competitive Balance Tax is structured is to avoid this scenario entirely. The annual luxury tax hit is calculated on the average annual value of the contract, not its value in any given year. So, in your scenario, it would be a $35 million hit no matter what Cole got paid in 2021.


Secondly, I’m not sure that teams will want to defer the money until after any work stoppage ended. They’ll be negotiating and leveraging their power to make baseball’s financial power dynamics tilt even more in their favor. Backloading a contract like that may actually end up hurting more than it helps from an ownership perspective. But we’ll see.


Finally, I don’t think either side is going to treat a work stoppage as a given. Even if it seems that way to us. If it would alter the calculus of any player, it would be the mid-market sort of players, not top-of-the-line guys like Cole. They’re the ones who are going to get paid no matter what. It’s your more average free agent that may want to cash in now with all of this future uncertainty. Interesting idea though, and the labor strife is an interesting calculation that some agents now have to consider.


George Asks:  Without even unloading Happ, doesn’t the potential savings from CC, maybe Didi, Romine, and Betances, not to mention anything salvaged from Ellsbury, make going after Cole much easier and doable?


I think this is worth considering, but only to a degree. The Yankees will likely need to fill those roles, be it with those players or another combination. Even if they sign Cole, they won’t be done, at least I don’t think so. Trading Happ, which we’ve covered here before, is one way to free up some money. With that said, though, the Yankees have indicated that they essentially have a blank check with Cole. So that’s nice.


That might be because of upcoming financial “flexibility”, as is it is often described. They’ve reset their CBT hit in recent years so their penalties will be less severe than they could be. Not to mention, they have a lot of money coming off the books after 2020. Even counting just Masahiro Tanaka and James Paxton, they’ll clear $35 million off their CBT hit following this year. That doesn’t count Happ if his option doesn’t vest.


In other words, they could very well run a large salary this year if they signed Cole and aim to “reset” it again after 2020. There’s upcoming flexibility to be sure. However, they should not do this. They should sign Cole and not let themselves be inhibited in the future due to payroll concerns, either. Even though there is a limit, I’m fairly confident they can spend more than they do now. I’ve spoken enough about that in the past, though, so no need to beat a dead horse. Right now I’m just glad we’re hearing what we’re hearing about Cole.


Paul Asks: Had a thought regarding the Urshela/Andujar question: what if the Yanks took the opener concept from the mound to third base?  It could work like this: put Andujar toward the top of the order, first or second, and give him a set number of at-bats (I would go with three, but two could work too).  Then Urshela knows that he’ll be going in the game every night after Andujar’s third at-bat. I know, maybe it’s just a fancy way of saying “late-inning defensive replacement.” But my understanding is that players like predictability when it comes to playing time.  This would provide that for both of them.  We’ve got two great players for one position.  Barring a trade, wouldn’t it make sense to give both of them a set role?



This is another interesting idea, though it is a fancy way of saying “late-inning defensive replacement.” I like the idea of giving people some predictability, but I do think that this is a little too cute by half.


First, we all saw last year what happens to the best laid plans of mice and men. The Yanks had no shortage of playing time to doll out in the infield in 2019 and I expect the same to be true in 2020. Even without, hopefully, the onslaught of injuries. The Yankees rest their guys and rotate their playing time. That’s good for them and I think it’s a strength of their player management. In other words, I think Andújar and Urshela can both play.


Secondly, we’ll all have to see what the future holds for both players. Andújar is coming off a major injury and Urshela’s 2019 was a very clear outlier in his career. I’m more of a believer in the Giodude now than I ever was before–there’s evidence that he’s legit–but he’s going to have to come out and do it again, I think. As for Andújar, there’s positional uncertainty there plus the fact that he’s going to have to probably shake off some rust, too.


Finally, this is the sort of problem that usually sorts itself out in the end. I doubt they’d do something like this in the regular season as opposed to just mixing up the playing time. It’s an October idea, for sure, but let’s just hope they all get to October healthy and productive first. That’s the starting point. Then we might see something like this, much like they did with Andújar and Hechavarria in 2018.

2 months ago  ::  Dec 06, 2019 - 11:01AM #392
NY23
Posts: 4,019

Weekly Mailbag: Dominguez's Trade Value, a Conundrum at SS, and Bring Back Gardy!


Mike S. asks: Crazy question for yet another slow start to the offseason... as impossible as it would be to actually predict, what could jasson dominguez fetch right now on the trade market before even making his stateside debut with all the hype around him?


(No, i wouldn’t actually want to see him traded, Not even a little)


As you correctly state in your question, pinning down Dominguez’s trade value is nearly impossible in this scenario.  Dominguez is the most hyped signing out Latin America that I can remember.  While Dominguez is 16 years old and has yet to play in a single game in a professional league, mainstream fans already know his name – this is not normal!  I expect sensationalism when mainstream sportswriters attempt to evaluate prospects, but Dominguez has garnered absurd praise, even by sensationalist standards.  As ridiculous as it sounds (and it is a bit ridiculous), Dominguez has been routinely compared to Mike Trout and Mickey Mantle.  Despite that seemingly impossible praise, the Yankees, who are typically very measured in their public statements about prospects, have added to the hype.  The Yankees’ Director of Latin American Operations, Mario Garza, was quoted in Baseball America as saying, “It’s almost like taking the best of anybody you have, and then it’s all in one guy.”  In short, I don’t think Jasson Dominguez could be hyped any more than he is right now by the media, fans, and even baseball insiders.


We don’t even have realistic trade comps for someone like Dominguez.  Some might try to compare the Fernando Tatis Jr. trade to a Dominguez trade scenario, but that really doesn’t compare for a couple of reasons.  For one, the White Sox got fleeced, taking on significant salary and horrendous performance by acquiring James Shields as the sole return.  More importantly, while Tatis Jr. would eventually become the consensus #1 or #2 prospect in baseball, Tatis Jr. was not yet an upper echelon blue-chip prospect at the time of the trade.  So, that trade doesn’t work.


The only other comp I can come up with is the trade that sent Josh Beckett and Mike Lowell to Boston in exchange for, among others, Hanley Ramirez.  Hanley Ramirez was one of baseball’s top prospects at the time of the trade, and became an MVP candidate for Florida soon after.  This trade has its issues as well, though.  For one, I can’t think of a modern team that would sell-off its entire team at all costs the way the Marlins did in 2005, so finding a similar trade partner in today’s day and age seems remote.  This trade also had other major pieces coming back to Florida, namely Annibal Sanchez, so it is tough to pin down just how much value Ramirez had on his own in this trade.  Most importantly, Ramirez had already reached AA at the time of the trade, so comparing his value to a 16-year-old who hasn’t played pro ball yet doesn’t make a lot of sense.


So, unless I’m missing a historical trade that is ripe for comparison (and if I am, let me know!), we have no comps to use for a Jasson Dominguez trade.  The Yankees are in win-now mode, so any trade involving Dominguez would be for someone (a starting pitcher or shortstop, possibly?) that could help the Yankees win the World Series in 2020.  Let’s try to lay out what that trade could look like.


Dominguez, despite the hype, is a legitimately good prospect.  Most outlets have ranked Dominguez as one of the Yankees’ top-3 prospects, and some have even gone as far as to include Dominguez in their top-100 prospect lists.  That tells us that Dominguez clearly would have real value on the trade market, but due to the fact that he is so far from the big leagues, the high ceiling his skillset would typically fetch in a trade is tempered somewhat.


For that reason, I think that in order to trade Dominguez, the Yankees would have to package him as part of a larger deal that includes multiple prospects.  Michael, this is a lot of fun to think about, and as much as I don’t see the Yankees trading Dominguez this off-season, our next question deals with exactly the type of trade of which I could see Dominguez being a part.


Lionel asks: do you remain convinced that Lindor won't be traded and, if so, how do you suggest the Yankees fill the shortstop position?


Paul is certain that Gleyber will be the shortstop but I worry about his lack of ideal range and notice that he seems to be "filling out" in a way that suggests that his range won't be lengthening


I have a very hard time seeing a Lindor trade this off-season, despite the smoke surrounding his status.  Despite the fact that multiple people have used baseballtradevalues.com to show a path to a Yankee trade for Lindor, I think that particular algorithm is underrating Lindor’s value to the Indians.  Most of the trade scenarios that I have seen for the Yankees-Indians on the internet would be palatable to me as a Yankee fan, which tells me that we haven’t yet found a workable trade for Lindor.


However, Michael’s question above gets to the heart of the Lindor debate: the trade would have to hurt more than a little to get the Indians to budge.  Miguel Andujar is an obvious trade candidate, but the Yankees are selling way low with regards to his current value.  Andujar is coming off of a significant injury and may really be a 1B instead of a 3B, which significantly hurts his value.  However, he still has some shine from his prospect status and rookie success, and he remains a controllable asset that could stick around even after the Indians finish rebuilding or re-tooling.


Beyond Andujar, I think that the Yankees need to include 2 blue-chip prospects (one close to Major League action, and one further away), and 1 solid prospect.  Again, this would hurt, but I think that to round out a reasonable trade offer, the Yankees would have to offer someone like Deivi Garcia as the near-ready blue-chipper, a lottery ticket in Jasson Dominguez, and a guy like Clint Frazier.  Some might balk at that price, but I think that type of trade is what it will take to pry Lindor from the Indians this off-season.


As far as how the Yankees fill the SS position in 2020 is concerned, I am somewhere between where you and Paul sit on the spectrum.  I think that Paul is correct in thinking that the Yankees would be okay with Torres starting at SS, and I agree with you in thinking that playing Torres at SS everyday is not an ideal defensive configuration.  The small-sample-size metrics from 2019 say that Torres played a very good SS.  I really don’t have a ton of faith in any defensive metrics that haven’t been accumulated in multi-season sample sizes, but the eye test told me that Torres was adequate at SS: his arm is plenty strong for the position, he showed good feel moving around the 2B bag, and he was relatively sure-handed in a small sample.  However, I agree that Torres’ range average at best, and is likely to diminish as Torres continues to fill-out.  Based on that assessment, I think I could live with Torres playing SS everyday on a trial basis this season, but I have a hard time seeing him stick at the position long-term.


In lieu of a trade for a big-time SS, I really want to see Didi Gregorius back in pinstripes.  I think that Didi has handled SS admirably since Jeter’s retirement, and his defensive abilities do not appear diminished following Tommy John Surgery.  I also don’t think that it will take a long-term commitment to retain Didi’s services, as I do not see significant demand on the Free Agent market for a SS.  I want to see the Yankees find a 2-3 year pact that is palatable for both sides so that a reunion can occur.  I think the Yankees would miss Didi if they let him get away.


Stephanie asks: Will the Yankees re-sign Brett Gardner?  I’m getting worried that we haven’t heard any news yet!


I wouldn’t worry just yet!  The Yankees have moved slower than I anticipated towards a reunion with Gardy, but I think that has more to do with the fact that the Yankees have had other priorities early on in Free Agency, particularly with reports of the full-court press the Yankees are executing on Gerrit Cole.  I think that the Yankees and Gardner will eventually work out another 1-year deal.  The Yankees need a CF, and Gardner doesn’t really seem interested in playing elsewhere.  I hope Gardy gets to finish out his career in pinstripes.

2 months ago  ::  Dec 06, 2019 - 11:17AM #393
Max
Posts: 3,247

Dec 5, 2019 -- 11:06PM, jimwest wrote:





Presuming Gregorius is gone, Torres goes to short, and DJLM will be at second. That gives Ford a chance to share first. I'd like to see him get as much time as possible to see what he can do. A Voit/Ford platoon gives that lefty/righty combination.




Not a bad idea Jim, but if the Cubs are looking to drop payroll, the Yankees should see if Rizzo is available. I don't care how many 1Bman the Yankees have they don't compare to Rizzo. He's an excellent fielder, he's a lefty that hits for power and he doesn't strikeout much.  

1 month ago  ::  Dec 06, 2019 - 11:35PM #394
jimwest
Posts: 2,251

Dec 6, 2019 -- 11:17AM, Max wrote:


Dec 5, 2019 -- 11:06PM, jimwest wrote:





Presuming Gregorius is gone, Torres goes to short, and DJLM will be at second. That gives Ford a chance to share first. I'd like to see him get as much time as possible to see what he can do. A Voit/Ford platoon gives that lefty/righty combination.




Not a bad idea Jim, but if the Cubs are looking to drop payroll, the Yankees should see if Rizzo is available. I don't care how many 1Bman the Yankees have they don't compare to Rizzo. He's an excellent fielder, he's a lefty that hits for power and he doesn't strikeout much.  




Max, from what I have read, Rizzo is very unlikely to be put on the block. He is getting $16.5m this year and next (presuming the Cubs exercise their option on him), which for a guy of his stats, is very reasonable.

1 month ago  ::  Dec 07, 2019 - 8:41AM #395
yankoldfan
Posts: 8,764

Dec 6, 2019 -- 11:35PM, jimwest wrote:


Dec 6, 2019 -- 11:17AM, Max wrote:


Dec 5, 2019 -- 11:06PM, jimwest wrote:





Presuming Gregorius is gone, Torres goes to short, and DJLM will be at second. That gives Ford a chance to share first. I'd like to see him get as much time as possible to see what he can do. A Voit/Ford platoon gives that lefty/righty combination.




Not a bad idea Jim, but if the Cubs are looking to drop payroll, the Yankees should see if Rizzo is available. I don't care how many 1Bman the Yankees have they don't compare to Rizzo. He's an excellent fielder, he's a lefty that hits for power and he doesn't strikeout much.  




Max, from what I have read, Rizzo is very unlikely to be put on the block. He is getting $16.5m this year and next (presuming the Cubs exercise their option on him), which for a guy of his stats, is very reasonable.




If Ca$hman/Hal doesn't want to spend the money to bring back Didi what makes anyone think they'll add Rizzo's $16.5M to their payroll ?? I'm wondering, don't the Yankees have a pretty good prospect that's a couple of years or so away that's a SS ?? I'm like an earlier post, I think Torres can manage SS but I don't think he's a long term SS and his best position is 2nd or even some day 3rd base ??


Like so many, I'd like to see Didi back but I think Didi is going to have to take a paycut from which other teams might pay him to stay a Yankee ??

1 month ago  ::  Dec 07, 2019 - 9:13AM #396
NY23
Posts: 4,019

New York Times | Tyler Kepner: The Yankees have been interested in Gerrit Cole for over a decade now. It all started when they drafted him out of high school in the first round of the 2008 draft. Since then, New York has tried to trade for him, and now they’re trying to sign him to what is expected to be a historic contract. Will Cole finally end up in pinstripes after 11 years?


NJ.com | Mike Rosenstein: The Yankees have been in talks with and have made offers to Brett Gardner in hopes of bringing him back for his 13th season with the team. Gardner isn’t the only Yankees free agent, though. Didi GregoriusDellin Betances, and Austin Romine are free agents as well, and their markets could be heating up.


New York Daily News | Bradford William DavisLuke Voit was a key part of the Yankees’ offense before injuring his core muscle during their trip to London, England. Six weeks ago, the slugger received surgery on his core that he needed a long time ago. Because of that, Voit promises not to rush back from injury ever again.


CBS Sports | Shanna McCarriston: Brian Cashman kept his tradition of rappelling down the Landmark Building in Connecticut going on Friday morning, but this time, he received a surprise message. “Please sign Gerrit Cole” was placed in a window on the 10th floor. It seems as though everyone wants Cole in their stocking this holiday season.


Yankees, Brett Gardner Still Negotiating Contract


MLB rumors: What Yankees target Gerrit Cole wants besides money; Nationals take on Stephen Strasburg; Mets add pitcher; Latest on Didi Gregorius - nj.com


1 month ago  ::  Dec 07, 2019 - 9:14AM #397
NY23
Posts: 4,019

The Marlins are seeking relievers who can do a better job limiting walks than their bullpen cast in 2019 did, Joe Frisaro of MLB.com relays. Miami’s relief corps finished the year with the second-highest walk rate in the game (4.37 per nine), and as president of baseball operations said, “you can’t defend a walk.” Frisaro names longtime Yankees reliever Dellin Betances as a potential target for the club in free agency, though it’s unclear whether that’s anything more than speculation. Betances was often dominant before missing almost all of last season with multiple injuries, but control hasn’t necessarily been his forte. The 31-year-old walked more than 6.5 batters per nine as recently as 2017.

1 month ago  ::  Dec 07, 2019 - 9:17AM #398
NY23
Posts: 4,019

What MLB's new rules should mean for the Yankees


New rules will increase the importance of pitchers who can shoulder a significant load.


The Yankees have repeatedly built one of the top bullpens in baseball over the last few season. A new rule limiting September roster sizes, however, will cause bullpen-reliant pitching staffs to become more vulnerable heading into the pressure cooker that is the playoffs.


All reports indicate that the Yankees are placing a priority on starting pitching this offseason, with one of the best free agent starting pitching classes in recent years. They must capitalize on this market to preserve a bullpen advantage and protect their high-leverage assets from overuse and overexposure.


Beginning in 2020, teams will no longer be allowed to increase their rosters to 40 players in September. This is a rule that the Yankees have taken advantage of, expanding their active major-league roster size into the mid-30s while giving their manager numerous additional arms capable of negotiating the late-season innings. In an effort to speed up games, and stop managers from an endless cycle of pitching changes, rosters will be limited to 28 players in September. For playoff teams built to rely heavily on their bullpen, this will prevent teams from resting their bullpens as much as they may like.


The 2019 Yankees rested their best relievers down the stretch. With a big division lead throughout much of the second half and into September, the Yankees backed down the workload for their four best relief pitchers in September. Aroldis ChapmanTommy KahnleAdam Ottavino, and Zack Britton all had season lows in appearances and innings pitched in the final month of the regular season.


While the rule change will be a factor every season, the 2020 schedule provides an immediate incentive to add more starters. Over the course of a five- or seven-game playoff series, teams can lock in on a relief pitcher’s limited arsenal, and it was clearly on the mind of one Yankees reliever following the ALCS. "The more times you face a guy, obviously, as relievers, you get uber-exposed,” Zack Britton told a reporter for The Athletic. Britton continued, saying “It’s the one thing I always say: that’s why we’re relievers, not starters, You overexpose guys, it’s inevitable that eventually they’re going to get got a little bit.”


The Yankees finish the 2020 season with 10 of their last 13 games against likely playoff competition in Tampa Bay and Houston. While there are many ways that the season could play out, it is possible that the AL East, home-field advantage, and even just making the playoffs could be on the line over the last two weeks of September. The Yankees could also have a replay of 2019, where they had the division title locked up relatively early, but without the expanded rosters, it is certain that both teams will get extra first hand looks at the key members of the Yankees bullpen right before the playoffs begin.


Even without the scheduling quirk, the Yankees are going to have innings on their mind throughout the 2020 season. Luis Severino and Jordan Montgomery are both coming off seasons where they threw fewer than 50 competitive innings between the minors and majors. There is a very real chance that both hit a wall with their performance, and that the team will want to limit their work load with a goal of playing late into October.


Beyond Severino and Montgomery’s long term health concerns, the Yankees will be looking to avoid triggering J.A. Happ’s $17 million vesting option as well, should the lefty remain on the team next year. It may seem easy to say that Happ will never reach 27 starts or 165 innings pitched, but without the extra September arms to absorb innings down the stretch, Happ could be knocking right on the door for his innings totals.


Help from the minors could also run into an innings wall as recent 40-man roster additions Mike King and Nick Nelson are both coming off injury-shortened seasons. Top pitching prospect Deivi Garcia has yet to work a full minor league season as a starter after beginning the 2018 season in June, and moving to a relief role in August of this year.


Enter the elite starters on the market. Gerrit Cole has thrown over 200 innings four times in his career, including the last three seasons. He is considered by many to be the best pitcher in the game, and is exactly the type of pitcher that every team wants. Stephen Strasburg does not have a reputation as an innings eater, but he has averaged 168 innings a season since 2012. Madison Bumgarner comes with a tremendous postseason resume, and rebounded from two injury-shortened seasons to throw 207.2 innings in 2019. Even Dallas Keuchel has thrown over 200 innings multiple times in his career, and as recently as his last full season in 2018. Bottom line, just sign Gerrit Cole.


While it is always good to have an elite bullpen, the time is right for the Yankees to focus on signing starting pitching. The new rules for 2020 will only emphasize the need for starters who can work through lineups multiple times. Teams will not be able to rely on expanded rosters to eat the innings in September blowouts or when they want to give their relievers an extra day off. In addition, the Yankees are staring at a season where they are finishing the season against likely playoff teams, and numerous members of their starting rotation are facing situations where their expected innings will be limited. Yankees fans don’t need another rationale for pushing their team to chase Cole or Strasburg, but there really does seem to be a plethora of reasons pointing the team in that direction.

1 month ago  ::  Dec 07, 2019 - 11:58AM #399
BW26
Posts: 7,662
Starting pitching please.
[
1 month ago  ::  Dec 07, 2019 - 1:56PM #400
Max
Posts: 3,247

Dec 7, 2019 -- 8:41AM, yankoldfan wrote:


Dec 6, 2019 -- 11:35PM, jimwest wrote:


Dec 6, 2019 -- 11:17AM, Max wrote:


Dec 5, 2019 -- 11:06PM, jimwest wrote:





Presuming Gregorius is gone, Torres goes to short, and DJLM will be at second. That gives Ford a chance to share first. I'd like to see him get as much time as possible to see what he can do. A Voit/Ford platoon gives that lefty/righty combination.




Not a bad idea Jim, but if the Cubs are looking to drop payroll, the Yankees should see if Rizzo is available. I don't care how many 1Bman the Yankees have they don't compare to Rizzo. He's an excellent fielder, he's a lefty that hits for power and he doesn't strikeout much.  




Max, from what I have read, Rizzo is very unlikely to be put on the block. He is getting $16.5m this year and next (presuming the Cubs exercise their option on him), which for a guy of his stats, is very reasonable.




If Ca$hman/Hal doesn't want to spend the money to bring back Didi what makes anyone think they'll add Rizzo's $16.5M to their payroll ?? I'm wondering, don't the Yankees have a pretty good prospect that's a couple of years or so away that's a SS ?? I'm like an earlier post, I think Torres can manage SS but I don't think he's a long term SS and his best position is 2nd or even some day 3rd base ??


Like so many, I'd like to see Didi back but I think Didi is going to have to take a paycut from which other teams might pay him to stay a Yankee ??




As much as I like Didi, he isn't the player Rizzo is. Torres can take Didi's place, Rizzo would be a huge upgrade from Voit/Ford. The Yankees still have payroll flexibility even if they sign Cole. They will have even more payroll flexibility next season when Els' contract comes off their books.

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