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11 years ago  ::  Sep 08, 2011 - 4:35PM #1
bomberhojoe
Posts: 15,342

Since the weather has been so awful, I thought I would toss out a few nuggets of baseball (1 Yankee) trivia.  I found these interesting, I hope you do as well.

In 1908, Baseball Magazine coined the phrase "hall of fame" to describe pitchers who had thrown no-hitters.


A baseball thrown at 95 mph makes it from the pitcher's hand to home plate in 0.4 seconds.


The average life span of a major league baseball is 5-7 pitches.


Johnny Plessey batted .331 for the Cleveland Spiders in 1891, even though he spent the entire season batting with a rolled-up, lacquered copy of the Toledo Post-Dispatch!


Owner of the Chicago White Sox, Bill Veeck, used to have midgets as food vendors at the clubs home games, because he said that it meant that the paying public didn't have to have their view of the game spoiled!


Babe Ruth actually hit 715 home runs.  In 1918 Babe Ruth hit a "home run" with a teammate on first base in the bottom of the ninth inning of a tied game. Under the rules of the day, Ruth was credited with a triple.


 

John 3:16 * Ephesians 2:8-9 * Romans 10:9-10 * John 14:3-6 * Romans 5:8
11 years ago  ::  Sep 08, 2011 - 4:43PM #2
Stratocaster
Posts: 6,412
Good stuff Joe!
11 years ago  ::  Sep 08, 2011 - 4:55PM #3
61in61
Posts: 26,516

Sep 8, 2011 -- 4:35PM, bomberhojoe wrote:


Since the weather has been so awful, I thought I would toss out a few nuggets of baseball (1 Yankee) trivia.  I found these interesting, I hope you do as well.

In 1908, Baseball Magazine coined the phrase "hall of fame" to describe pitchers who had thrown no-hitters.


A baseball thrown at 95 mph makes it from the pitcher's hand to home plate in 0.4 seconds.


The average life span of a major league baseball is 5-7 pitches.


Johnny Plessey batted .331 for the Cleveland Spiders in 1891, even though he spent the entire season batting with a rolled-up, lacquered copy of the Toledo Post-Dispatch!


Owner of the Chicago White Sox, Bill Veeck, used to have midgets as food vendors at the clubs home games, because he said that it meant that the paying public didn't have to have their view of the game spoiled!


Babe Ruth actually hit 715 home runs.  In 1918 Babe Ruth hit a "home run" with a teammate on first base in the bottom of the ninth inning of a tied game. Under the rules of the day, Ruth was credited with a triple.


 




Ruth probably had more homers than 715. One odd rule was a ball was considered foul if it landed in foul territory even if it was fair when it left the field of play. I bet a lot of balls curved foul after passing the foul pole.

11 years ago  ::  Sep 08, 2011 - 5:08PM #4
bomberhojoe
Posts: 15,342

Sep 8, 2011 -- 4:55PM, 61in61 wrote:


Ruth probably had more homers than 715. One odd rule was a ball was considered foul if it landed in foul territory even if it was fair when it left the field of play. I bet a lot of balls curved foul after passing the foul pole.




Good point 61.  I'm not sure if there were many games that were cancelled prior to 5 innings.  If so he may have lost a dinger or 3 to that.

John 3:16 * Ephesians 2:8-9 * Romans 10:9-10 * John 14:3-6 * Romans 5:8
11 years ago  ::  Sep 08, 2011 - 5:34PM #5
BigGuy
Posts: 66,015

Sep 8, 2011 -- 4:55PM, 61in61 wrote:


Sep 8, 2011 -- 4:35PM, bomberhojoe wrote:


Since the weather has been so awful, I thought I would toss out a few nuggets of baseball (1 Yankee) trivia.  I found these interesting, I hope you do as well.

In 1908, Baseball Magazine coined the phrase "hall of fame" to describe pitchers who had thrown no-hitters.


A baseball thrown at 95 mph makes it from the pitcher's hand to home plate in 0.4 seconds.


The average life span of a major league baseball is 5-7 pitches.


Johnny Plessey batted .331 for the Cleveland Spiders in 1891, even though he spent the entire season batting with a rolled-up, lacquered copy of the Toledo Post-Dispatch!


Owner of the Chicago White Sox, Bill Veeck, used to have midgets as food vendors at the clubs home games, because he said that it meant that the paying public didn't have to have their view of the game spoiled!


Babe Ruth actually hit 715 home runs.  In 1918 Babe Ruth hit a "home run" with a teammate on first base in the bottom of the ninth inning of a tied game. Under the rules of the day, Ruth was credited with a triple.


 




Ruth probably had more homers than 715. One odd rule was a ball was considered foul if it landed in foul territory even if it was fair when it left the field of play. I bet a lot of balls curved foul after passing the foul pole.




Not only that, but there was a time back in Babe's era when walkoff homers were only counted as a single if a runner was on base.  Elias actually did the count on that once, but I don't remember how many homers he got screwed out of.  It was only a few.

"Leave the gun. Take the cannoli."
11 years ago  ::  Sep 09, 2011 - 8:22AM #6
bomberhojoe
Posts: 15,342

Sep 8, 2011 -- 5:34PM, BigGuy wrote:


Not only that, but there was a time back in Babe's era when walkoff homers were only counted as a single if a runner was on base.  Elias actually did the count on that once, but I don't remember how many homers he got screwed out of.  It was only a few.




Big, I read that they gave the batter as many bases as it would take to force in the winning run.  So if there were 2 men on and the team needed 1 run they would award the batter a double.  Or was it if the runner was on thrid the batter got a single?????  Much easier to understand the way they do it now.

John 3:16 * Ephesians 2:8-9 * Romans 10:9-10 * John 14:3-6 * Romans 5:8
11 years ago  ::  Sep 09, 2011 - 12:05PM #7
BigGuy
Posts: 66,015

Sep 9, 2011 -- 8:22AM, bomberhojoe wrote:


Sep 8, 2011 -- 5:34PM, BigGuy wrote:


Not only that, but there was a time back in Babe's era when walkoff homers were only counted as a single if a runner was on base.  Elias actually did the count on that once, but I don't remember how many homers he got screwed out of.  It was only a few.




Big, I read that they gave the batter as many bases as it would take to force in the winning run.  So if there were 2 men on and the team needed 1 run they would award the batter a double.  Or was it if the runner was on thrid the batter got a single?????  Much easier to understand the way they do it now.




That's correct.  I did a lousy job trying to explain it.  But  he did get screwed out of at least some home runs back in the day because of that rule.

"Leave the gun. Take the cannoli."
11 years ago  ::  Sep 09, 2011 - 12:14PM #8
Carp
Posts: 5,791

Lets not forget the dimensions of Yankee Stadium back then as well.

11 years ago  ::  Sep 09, 2011 - 1:25PM #9
bomberhojoe
Posts: 15,342

Sep 9, 2011 -- 12:14PM, Carp wrote:


Lets not forget the dimensions of Yankee Stadium back then as well.




Thats true.  What was it like 3 miles to dead center???

John 3:16 * Ephesians 2:8-9 * Romans 10:9-10 * John 14:3-6 * Romans 5:8
11 years ago  ::  Sep 09, 2011 - 2:22PM #10
61in61
Posts: 26,516

Sep 9, 2011 -- 1:25PM, bomberhojoe wrote:


Sep 9, 2011 -- 12:14PM, Carp wrote:


Lets not forget the dimensions of Yankee Stadium back then as well.




Thats true.  What was it like 3 miles to dead center???




Almost...I think it was 490' to deepest left center and 487' to center. Deepest right center was 429' The right field porch was closer than today however. It started at 258' to the foul pole (there was a little section of the lower level seats that jutted onto the field at that point) and then went on a straight line to the 429' point. In 1928 home plate was moved forward a few feet so that those lower level seats were in foul territory. The foul pole was then 295', which still made for a very short porch because the outfield wall didn't curve back at that time like it did in the 1938 remodel. In 1938 they extended the 3rd deck beyond the foul pole toward the bleacher area. They also removed the short porch and curved the wall from the foul pole so that it went quiclky from 295' to 344' and then to 407'


If you remember the old stadium, monument park and most of the bullpen area was part of the playing field before 1938. Since Ruth batted left handed that short porch probably helped him more than those huge left field dimensions hurt him.


Here's a great sight with color coded overlays showing all the variations in field dimensions over the years:


www.andrewclem.com/Baseball/YankeeStadiu...


 

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