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First half report card
9 years ago  ::  Jul 15, 2013 - 12:56PM #21
meacham
Posts: 3,675

Jul 15, 2013 -- 10:37AM, luvdayanks wrote:


Jul 15, 2013 -- 12:16AM, Yankees wrote:


Cano should be at least an A.





Shocking you would think that. Cano is no better than a B+ due to his lack of hustle at times and his streakiness, or lack of consistency. Looking at just his numbers he gets an A, throw in the intangibles and he's a B+ at best.




If you were the GM and tried to pay Cano like a B+ this offseason, you'd lose him as a FA.    Then next year when David Adams is playing 2b and has a sub .700 OPS, you'd understand that he was an A.   

9 years ago  ::  Jul 15, 2013 - 1:28PM #22
luvdayanks
Posts: 31,506

Jul 15, 2013 -- 12:56PM, meacham wrote:


Jul 15, 2013 -- 10:37AM, luvdayanks wrote:


Jul 15, 2013 -- 12:16AM, Yankees wrote:


Cano should be at least an A.





Shocking you would think that. Cano is no better than a B+ due to his lack of hustle at times and his streakiness, or lack of consistency. Looking at just his numbers he gets an A, throw in the intangibles and he's a B+ at best.




If you were the GM and tried to pay Cano like a B+ this offseason, you'd lose him as a FA.    Then next year when David Adams is playing 2b and has a sub .700 OPS, you'd understand that he was an A.   





Well, I'm not the GM and I'm ranking him a B+ for the reasons I previously mentioned. I said it before, with his lack of hustle, and streaks and slumps, he didn't "pick" a very good year to become a FA. If Cashman wants to pay him like he's an A player so be it although I think that would be foolish. A player 8 years $200m, B+ player 6 years $132 mil. BTW, if he is lost to FA, David Adams is not going to be the player to replace him, I'm sure they would acquire someone in a trade or FA signing.

9 years ago  ::  Jul 15, 2013 - 1:47PM #23
Yes36223
Posts: 772

Jul 15, 2013 -- 9:54AM, grudz wrote:


Jul 14, 2013 -- 9:12PM, luvdayanks wrote:

IMO

CC    C
Pettite C-
Kuroda B+
Hughes C-
Phelps B
Logan B
Kelly A-
Claiborne  B
Warren  B
Joba  D
Nova C+
Robertson A
Mo A
Nuno B-
Cano B+
Overbay B
Nix C+
Nunez D
Romine F
Stewart B
Hafner D
Wells C-
Ichiro B
Gardner B

The rest, Youk, Gonzalez, Cruz and the rest of the band aids D-




Hafner's not an "F."  He's second on the team in homers. He's got the third highest slugging % and OPS on the team.  He's got an OBP that's much higher than Overbay.  He had a torrid April and won several games for the Yanks with clutch hits in the early part of the season.  And he's avoided major injury.  Sure, he's worn down over the last month and he's slumping, but it's more of a "C/C-" than an "F."  Or would you rather have a DH with no power at all.


Sorry, I meant to reply to the original poster, who gave him an "F."





I gave Hafner an "F" as I was reviewing him as just a DH. I wasn't comparing his stats against Overbay et al, who have opportunities to affect games w/defense & offense. I'm not sure how he wears down just being a DH. In my view, his ONLY job is to provide offense & therefore in this aspect he has failed up to this point in the season.

9 years ago  ::  Jul 15, 2013 - 1:48PM #24
meacham
Posts: 3,675

Jul 15, 2013 -- 1:28PM, luvdayanks wrote:


Jul 15, 2013 -- 12:56PM, meacham wrote:


Jul 15, 2013 -- 10:37AM, luvdayanks wrote:


Jul 15, 2013 -- 12:16AM, Yankees wrote:


Cano should be at least an A.





Shocking you would think that. Cano is no better than a B+ due to his lack of hustle at times and his streakiness, or lack of consistency. Looking at just his numbers he gets an A, throw in the intangibles and he's a B+ at best.




If you were the GM and tried to pay Cano like a B+ this offseason, you'd lose him as a FA.    Then next year when David Adams is playing 2b and has a sub .700 OPS, you'd understand that he was an A.   





Well, I'm not the GM and I'm ranking him a B+ for the reasons I previously mentioned. I said it before, with his lack of hustle, and streaks and slumps, he didn't "pick" a very good year to become a FA. If Cashman wants to pay him like he's an A player so be it although I think that would be foolish. A player 8 years $200m, B+ player 6 years $132 mil. BTW, if he is lost to FA, David Adams is not going to be the player to replace him, I'm sure they would acquire someone in a trade or FA signing.




When you consider his offense, and then the fact that he's doing that while playing 2b (and at a GG level) - at worst he's an A player.   Really should be an A+, but I'll remove the plus as he can't steal and does dog it at times.   But please, he's no less and is nowhere near being a B player, that's crazy.   He's the best at his position and one of the 5-10 best in the game.   Yes he dogs it at times, so did Rickey Henderson.   No that doesn't lower his value an entire letter.   He'll get close to 200 million if he keeps his current numbers up.   There is no one else in baseball thaty will outproduce him at 2b, so no matter who you acquire you will get weaker.

9 years ago  ::  Jul 15, 2013 - 1:55PM #25
luvdayanks
Posts: 31,506

Jul 15, 2013 -- 1:48PM, meacham wrote:


Jul 15, 2013 -- 1:28PM, luvdayanks wrote:


Jul 15, 2013 -- 12:56PM, meacham wrote:


Jul 15, 2013 -- 10:37AM, luvdayanks wrote:


Jul 15, 2013 -- 12:16AM, Yankees wrote:


Cano should be at least an A.





Shocking you would think that. Cano is no better than a B+ due to his lack of hustle at times and his streakiness, or lack of consistency. Looking at just his numbers he gets an A, throw in the intangibles and he's a B+ at best.




If you were the GM and tried to pay Cano like a B+ this offseason, you'd lose him as a FA.    Then next year when David Adams is playing 2b and has a sub .700 OPS, you'd understand that he was an A.   





Well, I'm not the GM and I'm ranking him a B+ for the reasons I previously mentioned. I said it before, with his lack of hustle, and streaks and slumps, he didn't "pick" a very good year to become a FA. If Cashman wants to pay him like he's an A player so be it although I think that would be foolish. A player 8 years $200m, B+ player 6 years $132 mil. BTW, if he is lost to FA, David Adams is not going to be the player to replace him, I'm sure they would acquire someone in a trade or FA signing.




When you consider his offense, and then the fact that he's doing that while playing 2b (and at a GG level) - at worst he's an A player.   Really should be an A+, but I'll remove the plus as he can't steal and does dog it at times.  But please, he's no less and is nowhere near being a B player, that's crazy.   He's the best at his position and one of the 5-10 best in the game.   Yes he dogs it at times, so did Rickey Henderson.   No that doesn't lower his value an entire letter.   He'll get close to 200 million if he keeps his current numbers up.   There is no one else in baseball thaty will outproduce him at 2b, so no matter who you acquire you will get weaker.




I didn't say he was a B player, I said B+ which is just a tad below A. 

9 years ago  ::  Jul 15, 2013 - 2:34PM #26
BigGuy
Posts: 66,015

2013 Midseason Review: The Grade A’s


By

No, it’s not the literal midway point of the season, but we’re going to use the four-day All-Star break to review the Yankees’ performance to date. We’re handing out letter grades this year, A through F. We start today with the A’s.


(Mike Stobe/Getty)

(Mike Stobe/Getty)



Let’s not kid ourselves here — not a whole lot has gone right for the Yankees this season. Not only have they dealt with a ton injuries, but they’ve also dealt with a ton of re-injuries as well. Mark Teixeira (wrist), Kevin Youkilis (back), Curtis Granderson (forearm, hand), and Derek Jeter (ankle, quad) all got hurt against almost immediately after coming off the DL. It’s pretty amazing when you think about it.


Despite all that, the Bombers sit seven games over .500 and just three games back of a playoff spot. They’re probably further back than they would like, but they are definitely still in the hunt despite all those injuries and re-injuries. The performance of the guys in this post is a big reason why. Here are the Grade A’s.


Robinson Cano
All of the injuries mean Cano has to be The Man, and that is exactly what he has been overall. Robbie is hitting .302/.386/.531 (143 wRC+) with 21 homers while starting every single game this year (91 of 95 at second base). He’s played 807.1 of 849.1 possible defensive innings (95.1%), which is nuts. Dude is an iron man. That offensive performance is right in line with what he’s done the last three years, and in fact his OBP is a career-high because he’s started taking walks when pitched around. Cano went through a stretch where he was flailing at pitcher’s pitches for a while. Thankfully that has ended. Robbie has been an absolute rock for the Yankees this season and deserves to be in the MVP conversation at this point.


Hiroki Kuroda
Remember when there was concern about how Kuroda, an older pitcher coming from a big park in the NL to a small park in the AL, would transition to pinstripes? That seems silly now. Kuroda has pitched like a legitimate ace this year, posting a 2.65 ERA and 3.62 ERA FIP in 118.2 innings. Among qualified AL starters, he ranks second in ERA behind only Felix Hernandez (2.53). That’s pretty remarkable considering his home ballpark. Kuroda was a huge All-Star snub — seriously, they took Chris Tillman (!) before him — but I’m totally fine with him getting four days to recharge the batteries for the second half. The Yankees are going to need him. Kuroda has been brilliant since coming to New York and especially this year. What a stud.


(Ezra Shaw/Getty)

(Ezra Shaw/Getty)



Mariano Rivera
Forty-three years old? Missed almost all of last season with a knee injury? No big deal. Rivera has been as good as ever in 2013, going 30-for-32 in save chances with a 1.83 ERA and 2.65 FIP in 34.1 innings. He’s actually giving up more hits than usual, but it seems like most have been weakly hit bloopers that just find some outfield grass. Hopefully his .333 BABIP returns to his .264 career average in the second half. The Yankees have relied on their pitching staff heavily this year, and Rivera has been there to shut the door and preserve every lead time after time. I can’t believe he’s retiring after this season; it looks like he could pitch forever.


David Robertson
Rivera can’t do it all himself, of course. Robertson continues to be elite as his setup man, pitching to a 2.11 ERA and 2.51 FIP in 38.1 innings. The control-challenged right-hander cut down on his walks in the second half last season and that has carried over to this year — his 2.82 BB/9 (8.0 BB%) is far better than his 4.10 BB/9 (10.8 BB%) career average. Robertson and Rivera are arguably the best setup-closer combination in baseball, and the Yankees are lucky to have such an elite end-game duo. They’ve leaned on these guys a ton this year and they continue to get the job done.


Joe Girardi
Yes, every manager makes questionable pitching changes and calls for weird double-steals from time to time. It comes with the territory. But think about the job Girardi has done controlling what could have been a very chaotic situation. Players are getting hurt seemingly non-stop and the Yankees have played just about .500 ball since the calendar flipped to May, but things around the team remain relatively calm and orderly. This season could have very easily spiraled out of control, but Girardi has prevented that from happening. He deserves a lot of credit and should get Manager of the Year consideration in a few months.

"Leave the gun. Take the cannoli."
9 years ago  ::  Jul 15, 2013 - 2:36PM #27
BigGuy
Posts: 66,015

Jul 14, 2013 -- 11:51PM, ArtVandelay wrote:


Hank.  A+




I met Hank last week and he's a little upset at you for skimping on your prosposed contract offers.

"Leave the gun. Take the cannoli."
9 years ago  ::  Jul 15, 2013 - 2:38PM #28
newinn
Posts: 39,003

He's a B this year. That's my grade, not cashmans, not anyone elses just mine. He still dogs it, he's still streaky and I (not anyone else, just me) don't like his style of play. You can all give him A+++++++++ and it doesn't change my opinion and if the Yanks sign him for more then 6 years, they are crazy

9 years ago  ::  Jul 15, 2013 - 2:47PM #29
luvdayanks
Posts: 31,506

Jul 15, 2013 -- 2:34PM, BigGuy wrote:



2013 Midseason Review: The Grade A’s


By

No, it’s not the literal midway point of the season, but we’re going to use the four-day All-Star break to review the Yankees’ performance to date. We’re handing out letter grades this year, A through F. We start today with the A’s.


(Mike Stobe/Getty)

(Mike Stobe/Getty)



Let’s not kid ourselves here — not a whole lot has gone right for the Yankees this season. Not only have they dealt with a ton injuries, but they’ve also dealt with a ton of re-injuries as well. Mark Teixeira (wrist), Kevin Youkilis (back), Curtis Granderson (forearm, hand), and Derek Jeter (ankle, quad) all got hurt against almost immediately after coming off the DL. It’s pretty amazing when you think about it.


Despite all that, the Bombers sit seven games over .500 and just three games back of a playoff spot. They’re probably further back than they would like, but they are definitely still in the hunt despite all those injuries and re-injuries. The performance of the guys in this post is a big reason why. Here are the Grade A’s.


Robinson Cano
All of the injuries mean Cano has to be The Man, and that is exactly what he has been overall. Robbie is hitting .302/.386/.531 (143 wRC+) with 21 homers while starting every single game this year (91 of 95 at second base). He’s played 807.1 of 849.1 possible defensive innings (95.1%), which is nuts. Dude is an iron man. That offensive performance is right in line with what he’s done the last three years, and in fact his OBP is a career-high because he’s started taking walks when pitched around. Cano went through a stretch where he was flailing at pitcher’s pitches for a while. Thankfully that has ended. Robbie has been an absolute rock for the Yankees this season and deserves to be in the MVP conversation at this point.


Hiroki Kuroda
Remember when there was concern about how Kuroda, an older pitcher coming from a big park in the NL to a small park in the AL, would transition to pinstripes? That seems silly now. Kuroda has pitched like a legitimate ace this year, posting a 2.65 ERA and 3.62 ERA FIP in 118.2 innings. Among qualified AL starters, he ranks second in ERA behind only Felix Hernandez (2.53). That’s pretty remarkable considering his home ballpark. Kuroda was a huge All-Star snub — seriously, they took Chris Tillman (!) before him — but I’m totally fine with him getting four days to recharge the batteries for the second half. The Yankees are going to need him. Kuroda has been brilliant since coming to New York and especially this year. What a stud.


(Ezra Shaw/Getty)

(Ezra Shaw/Getty)



Mariano Rivera
Forty-three years old? Missed almost all of last season with a knee injury? No big deal. Rivera has been as good as ever in 2013, going 30-for-32 in save chances with a 1.83 ERA and 2.65 FIP in 34.1 innings. He’s actually giving up more hits than usual, but it seems like most have been weakly hit bloopers that just find some outfield grass. Hopefully his .333 BABIP returns to his .264 career average in the second half. The Yankees have relied on their pitching staff heavily this year, and Rivera has been there to shut the door and preserve every lead time after time. I can’t believe he’s retiring after this season; it looks like he could pitch forever.


David Robertson
Rivera can’t do it all himself, of course. Robertson continues to be elite as his setup man, pitching to a 2.11 ERA and 2.51 FIP in 38.1 innings. The control-challenged right-hander cut down on his walks in the second half last season and that has carried over to this year — his 2.82 BB/9 (8.0 BB%) is far better than his 4.10 BB/9 (10.8 BB%) career average. Robertson and Rivera are arguably the best setup-closer combination in baseball, and the Yankees are lucky to have such an elite end-game duo. They’ve leaned on these guys a ton this year and they continue to get the job done.


Joe Girardi
Yes, every manager makes questionable pitching changes and calls for weird double-steals from time to time. It comes with the territory. But think about the job Girardi has done controlling what could have been a very chaotic situation. Players are getting hurt seemingly non-stop and the Yankees have played just about .500 ball since the calendar flipped to May, but things around the team remain relatively calm and orderly. This season could have very easily spiraled out of control, but Girardi has prevented that from happening. He deserves a lot of credit and should get Manager of the Year consideration in a few months.





That's one of the reasons I don't give him an A. You can bet your booty he'll flail at pitches during stretches in the second half and won't hustle every play. MVP consideration? I'm sure he'll be in the discussion but right now there are several players ahead of him IMO.

9 years ago  ::  Jul 15, 2013 - 3:02PM #30
Lola
Posts: 30,017

Jul 15, 2013 -- 2:34PM, BigGuy wrote:



2013 Midseason Review: The Grade A’s


By

No, it’s not the literal midway point of the season, but we’re going to use the four-day All-Star break to review the Yankees’ performance to date. We’re handing out letter grades this year, A through F. We start today with the A’s.


(Mike Stobe/Getty)

(Mike Stobe/Getty)



Let’s not kid ourselves here — not a whole lot has gone right for the Yankees this season. Not only have they dealt with a ton injuries, but they’ve also dealt with a ton of re-injuries as well. Mark Teixeira (wrist), Kevin Youkilis (back), Curtis Granderson (forearm, hand), and Derek Jeter (ankle, quad) all got hurt against almost immediately after coming off the DL. It’s pretty amazing when you think about it.


Despite all that, the Bombers sit seven games over .500 and just three games back of a playoff spot. They’re probably further back than they would like, but they are definitely still in the hunt despite all those injuries and re-injuries. The performance of the guys in this post is a big reason why. Here are the Grade A’s.


Robinson Cano
All of the injuries mean Cano has to be The Man, and that is exactly what he has been overall. Robbie is hitting .302/.386/.531 (143 wRC+) with 21 homers while starting every single game this year (91 of 95 at second base). He’s played 807.1 of 849.1 possible defensive innings (95.1%), which is nuts. Dude is an iron man. That offensive performance is right in line with what he’s done the last three years, and in fact his OBP is a career-high because he’s started taking walks when pitched around. Cano went through a stretch where he was flailing at pitcher’s pitches for a while. Thankfully that has ended. Robbie has been an absolute rock for the Yankees this season and deserves to be in the MVP conversation at this point.


Hiroki Kuroda
Remember when there was concern about how Kuroda, an older pitcher coming from a big park in the NL to a small park in the AL, would transition to pinstripes? That seems silly now. Kuroda has pitched like a legitimate ace this year, posting a 2.65 ERA and 3.62 ERA FIP in 118.2 innings. Among qualified AL starters, he ranks second in ERA behind only Felix Hernandez (2.53). That’s pretty remarkable considering his home ballpark. Kuroda was a huge All-Star snub — seriously, they took Chris Tillman (!) before him — but I’m totally fine with him getting four days to recharge the batteries for the second half. The Yankees are going to need him. Kuroda has been brilliant since coming to New York and especially this year. What a stud.


(Ezra Shaw/Getty)

(Ezra Shaw/Getty)



Mariano Rivera
Forty-three years old? Missed almost all of last season with a knee injury? No big deal. Rivera has been as good as ever in 2013, going 30-for-32 in save chances with a 1.83 ERA and 2.65 FIP in 34.1 innings. He’s actually giving up more hits than usual, but it seems like most have been weakly hit bloopers that just find some outfield grass. Hopefully his .333 BABIP returns to his .264 career average in the second half. The Yankees have relied on their pitching staff heavily this year, and Rivera has been there to shut the door and preserve every lead time after time. I can’t believe he’s retiring after this season; it looks like he could pitch forever.


David Robertson
Rivera can’t do it all himself, of course. Robertson continues to be elite as his setup man, pitching to a 2.11 ERA and 2.51 FIP in 38.1 innings. The control-challenged right-hander cut down on his walks in the second half last season and that has carried over to this year — his 2.82 BB/9 (8.0 BB%) is far better than his 4.10 BB/9 (10.8 BB%) career average. Robertson and Rivera are arguably the best setup-closer combination in baseball, and the Yankees are lucky to have such an elite end-game duo. They’ve leaned on these guys a ton this year and they continue to get the job done.


Joe Girardi
Yes, every manager makes questionable pitching changes and calls for weird double-steals from time to time. It comes with the territory. But think about the job Girardi has done controlling what could have been a very chaotic situation. Players are getting hurt seemingly non-stop and the Yankees have played just about .500 ball since the calendar flipped to May, but things around the team remain relatively calm and orderly. This season could have very easily spiraled out of control, but Girardi has prevented that from happening. He deserves a lot of credit and should get Manager of the Year consideration in a few months.




I would definitly give Cano an A. I love his seemingly effortless defense... he's the best 2nd baseman I've ever seen. Also he's taking walks when being pitched around. His numbers would be even better if he had some protection.

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